News

Story By Marv Meldrum
Photo By Bernie Laframboise

ORIGINALLY FROM MONROE, MICHIGAN AND A 23-YEAR VETERAN OF THE POLICE FORCE, FERNDALE’S NEW CHIEF OF POLICE, VINCENT PALAZZOLO, HAS A LONG RESUME THAT BEGINS WITH AN ENLISTMENT
IN THE ARMY. More recently, after two years as a captain on the Ferndale police force, he was tagged as the interim Chief of Police in May of 2018, and is now installed as the permanent Chief of Police.

Palazzolo served in the U.S. Military for 11 years, deployed to Iraq with the Michigan Army National Guard as an infantry soldier. His stellar resume includes serving on the Oakland County Crime Suppression Task Force, Team Commander of the Southeast Oakland SWAT, and Team Commander of the Oakland County Mobile Field Force.

Currently, he is a member of the Michigan Association of Chiefs of Police, the International Association of Chiefs of Police and Veterans of Foreign Wars. An advocate for veterans, Palazzolo is involved with the reintegration programs through physical fitness and veteran suicide prevention.

Palazzolo has a robust and sincere focus on community engagement and two years ago initialed the Department’s community engagement approach. He observes and follows six pillars of community policing laid out in the President’s task force on 21st Century Policing.

The Chief recalls when the housing bubble popped in 2008- 2009 and the Ferndale police force went from 54 officers down to 39. Half of those officers who were cut were bought out and half retired, but the Department still found ii necessary lo lay off five officers.

“In 2010, we lost the number two commander; the person who did the day-to-day nuts and bolts,” Palazzolo says. “So, the chief was doing all the work for two people. Personnel for the Department is 98 percent of their budget. As a department we were doing the minimum to survive; there was no extra training in that time frame because that takes money. Any training that wasn’t mandated by the state wasn’t done.”

“EVERYONE CALLS THE POLICE FOR EVERY PROBLEM,” Palazzolo explains. ”We have had to adapt to the full spectrum of the issues that come our way. We are training officers lo do a very tough job. Expectations are higher on public officials and police especially. Police are very visible today.”

“Now that I was made full-time chief, three positions need to be filled so we can start doing big projects. I need a captain. I have two lieutenants applying for that. A sergeant will be promoted to be a platoon commander. Then I’ve got to promote an officer to sergeant. Then we will have lo recruit to fill that officer’s position. The rest of 2018, we will just be trying lo get up lo full staffing!”

Fully staffed, the force is 41 strong, including the chief. They have six or seven civilians filling records and holding administrative positions. And don’t forget the crossing guards.

The City of Ferndale presents a large number of festivals and public events, such as the art fairs and the Dream Cruise. They pay for officer staffing, so there will be an extra four-to-five officers just assigned to those events. Holidays are quiet, but summer gets busy as downtown now has 23-plus liquor licenses. Three additional officers work Friday and Saturdays to maintain the bar district.

If you want lo know the inner workings of the Ferndale Police Department, residents can join the four-week long Citizen’s Police Academy each October. You learn how the Department works, and officers set up a situation and walk you through an actual mock homicide scene.

After the Academy, Chief Palazzolo wants to start the Chiefs Round Table with the graduates. People who have a little knowledge can help mold the future. They can meet every month or so and brief graduates on events and talk about policy.

PALAZZOLO HAS FIXED HIS ATTENTION on operating his Department efficiently, safely, ethically and morally, and dictated by laws and policies that were put in place for officers to follow.

There will always be random acts of violence. The Chiefs answer to that is, “The idea is to create an omnipresence.”

While they can’t anticipate or prevent everything, active patrolling helps to deter crime. But with the creation of the Internet, through stolen identities people can sit in their horn e and remotely do the crimes they used to do on the streets.

“Crime stats are down because it’s easier and safer for the criminal to do remote crime. Most of the crime we see is crime of opportunity, like breaking into cars, but they only really look for the open doors.”

“We need our public to have confidence in our Police Department and believe that we are ope.rating legally, morally and ethically.”

Chief Palazzolo wants lo let everyone know who they are, and he wants to build relationships with the public. “You don’t have to go on a retreat with someone to build a relationship. Just talking to high school students or chatting with someone on the phone is a connection. We are husbands, wives, and family members, just like anyone.”

By Mary MedrumB

MANY PEOPLE KNOW ANDY DIDOROSI AS THE PERSON WHO FOUNDED THE DETROIT BUS COMPANY, AFTER THE M-1 LIGHT RAIL PROJECT WAS PRONOUNCED DEAD IN 2012. About six months later, the Detroit Bus Company was borne out of a collection of used buses, a lot of spare parts and tinkering.

The Detroit Bus Company is available for tours, rentals, and people can purchase rides for school children and youth programs.

Although he has sparked quite a few small businesses, the Detroit Bus Company was Andy’s first well­ known entrepreneurial venture in Detroit. He has conceived of many dozens since, and executed several of those concepts.

These days you can catch Andy on social media hunting down electric “bird” scooters. His adventures with this technology and the citizens of Detroit led to some interesting revelations. The scooter businesses were not really addressing the population in Detroit that needed the scooters the most. So, he decided to obtain, assemble, charge and deliver at least 100 scooters with helmets lo neighborhood kids in Detroit at no cost to them. You can help. Go to his web site, www.playfreebird.com to find out how lo help with this project.

ANDY’S NEWEST VENTURE IS CALLED POOL. THE NAME DESCRIBES THE SHARING OF RESOURCES, CAPITAL, AND PHYSICAL REAL ESTA TE SPACES FOR THE BENEFIT OF EVERYONE INVOLVED. The particulars of the project can be found at www.hopinthepool.com. He will be launching an experiment in real community development where anybody in Michigan can invest small amounts of money and receive a real return back on their investment throughout the year. When you buy into a project, you own a real share in a house or building and gel your portion of the rent. If they ever decide lo sell the house as a group, investors/shareholders receive a portion of the sale. It’s true wealth-building.

Pool is a project where investors gel actual equity in the real estate project that they choose. Investors own shares in a house the way you would own shares in a company. Each piece of real estate is a different project with different shareholders, based on their interest in the project.

It’s a simple concept that is growing. Traditionally, if you want to invest in real estate, you need lo have the ability to buy a whole house. If you are lucky enough lo have a rich friend or family willing to invest with you, that’s great. Real estate is one of those things that people use to build generational wealth.

For most of us, the realization of wealth through property ownership is impossible or a long shot at best. So, if we can band together and make the projects work in the long term, everyone can benefit. This is radical wealth building. Pool is a way for anyone lo participate in the real estate market; it is a structural system that can result in large return.

This investment is in your own backyard. You can see the house and meet the renters. Unlike a REIT (Real Estate Investment Trust), which is a fund that investors put money into and hope that the fund manager chooses profitable properties, investors in Pool have full control over the direction of the funds they contribute and can choose the real estate in which they want to participate. As part of a REIT, you might own part of a strip mall in Vegas or a coffee shop in Lexington, Kentucky. Pool invests locally only, and you know intimately what your portfolio holdings are. Individuals in Pool only invest in distinct projects.

The first house was purchased by Didorosi and will be renovated by him. This iteration of the process will help him organize the entire enterprise.

‘We haven’t formally launched it yet because we are wailing for approval from the state,” explains Didorosi. They can’t share in financial arrangements or promise any kind of a return because of the rules of security law.

Pool believes investors should be able to see where every dollar goes, so Andy has taken care of that. Investors will get a dashboard where they can see every dollar in and out of the organization.

‘We’re proud of what we’re building and aren’t shy about showing off.”

DIDOROSI CAME UP WITH THE IDEA OF POOL WHEN LOOKING AT PROPERTIES that he was interested in buying. He tried to get buildings and ii was difficult. If you don’t have enough money or a bank or investors to help you secure the property, you have no access to the incredible wealth-building opportunity that is right in your own back yard.

Didorosi believes that the reason this hasn’t been accomplished by anyone up lo this point is because people might be afraid of running up against securities law, which is daunting. He is hoping he can reduce some of that friction and level the playing field so everyone can participate.

The dream is to be able to invest in commercial property and the businesses within it. The businesses within those commercial properties might also have the chance lo become partial owners in that project. As partial owners, they can help make decisions about the property and capture some of the value created, instead of just getting booted out when the owners decide to sell.

There is a lot of interest in the small amount of information that Didorosi has been able to share so far. ‘We are very strictly not soliciting or asking people lo invest yet. I personally know someone who has gotten in trouble with those laws, and it cost him $30,000.”

“I would love to see a large number of people invest into the real estate in their own communities directly. I think that will have a huge number of ripple effects. If people are the investors in the properties around them, ii will ensure that the businesses will thrive.”

He has a point. Investment in one’s own neighborhood is an investment in the outcome of those properties. There is elevation of human capital and social capital that follows in the wake of renovated property and infrastructure that is cared for and maintained. Public parks, schools, recreation centers, businesses, and cultural centers all prosper under the care of local ownership; good neighborhoods attracts good neighbors.

“We are in a crisis of ownership right now.”

Hong Kong owns a lot of property in Detroit. Large investment groups that don’t have any footprint in the city own much of the city.

“Local ownership will change the fabric of the city forever. We, as the people, have to be the next billionaire at the table. We have to make this a choice. We are a system of capitalism, which means that those with the capital get to make all the decisions. Until we assemble capital into an efficient structure that can go out and do the work, we’re not going to have any power in our own communities.”

By Sara E. Teller

Jill Warren and her husband, Rev. Robert Schoenhals, arrived at First United Methodist Church (at the corner of Leroy and Woodward) early the Sunday before Labor Day, and were met with a very unwelcome surprise.

As they approached the church’s main entrance, the couple noticed a derogatory flyer taped to the door. It featured an image of conspiracy theorist Alex Jones with a Star of David taped over his mouth as if to silence him. On either side were crude and offensive caricatures of Jewish men.

“My husband and I arrived at about 8:30 in the morning and noticed the flyer taped to the door. It contained hate speech, completely anti-Semitic, aggressive, just horrible,” Warren said. “My stomach just clenched up, and I had a gut feeling to walk the parameter of the church. Sure enough, I found one on each of the entrances.”

She immediately notified Ferndale police, as Rev. Schoenhals proceeded with his morning routine before members of the congregation arrived. “I took charge, so my husband could get ready, and they said they’d send an officer before my Sunday school class,” Warren explained. “We learned there had been other incidents. Flyers were also posted at Arts Beats and Eats and in downtown Detroit.”

Responding officers told her that taping the flyer to the door could be protected by free speech, and thus, may not necessarily constitute a crime. However, the Department would open an investigation to see if they could identify the perpetrator and bring charges for destruction of property or trespassing.

WARREN AND REV. SCHOENHALS SPREAD THE WORD to the congregation hat day, and Warren posted the following to social media, “Friends and neighbors – these [flyers] were taped to our church doors this morning. Be aware that hate groups do exist locally. #LoveIsBigger — at First United Methodist Church of Ferndale, MI.”

She said, “My husband informed the leadership team. We share a space with another congregation and he shared it with their leadership team. I shared it during Sunday school. We informed everyone internally first, then reached out to local pastors. We didn’t hear back, so we assumed they hadn’t noticed anything.”

Warren added, “The terrible thing is that we were right in the midst of a meet-your-neighbor event we had planned to host in Ferndale. The event is all about socializing and understanding different cultures. We had to push it back.”

CURRENTLY, THE POLICE HAVE A VIDEO of a Caucasian man in khakis, a white polo and a black hat with sunglasses posting the flyers outside the church. They are asking for help in identifying the man.

“That’s all we know at this point,” said Warren. “There was no property damage, but what this is, really, is a desecration of a sacred place of peace and safety.”

The couple have been with First United Methodist in Ferndale for five years. The church was established in 1922 and will soon be celebrating its century anniversary. Rev. Schoenhals has been in ministry since 1975 and is set to retire in five years.

“We love Ferndale – just love living here,” Warren said. “It’s progressive politically, diverse, and is small enough to enact policies and practices that get implemented. Ferndale is very community minded and there’s good leadership. We have yard signs stating, ‘Black Lives Matter,’ and ‘Love is Love.’ These show our values. On top of that, we’re a sanctuary congregation, so I think that could be why we were targeted.”

Warren speaks fondly of fellow church members, sharing the reaction of one member in particular to the incident. “After learning what had happened, this person said, ‘This is horrible, this is hate. Pray for that person.”

By Malissa Martin

WITH CHRISTMAS JUST AROUND THE CORNER, it’s heartbreaking to know that not every child will be a part of the celebration. However, for the past three years Fern-dale Youth Assistance (FYA, located inside Ferndale High School) has been changing that with their Annual Adopt-a-family Christmas program. Caseworker Tasha Hanson and office manager Melinda Hicks coordinate the program, which already has five families in need this year.

“Families come to us. They’re struggling financially. They can’t even get food on the table for the day, let alone think about Christmas,” Hanson said. So FYA pitches in to help by connecting them with volunteers who have agreed to “adopt” a family for the Holiday season. Once families are selected, the children fill out a wish list form provided by the FYA. Only kids receive wish lists; however, sometimes Hicks and Hanson will also purchase a small, thoughtful gift for the parents.

When a family agrees to adopt a family in need, they are given the wish list to use as a guide. “We ask if they need a jacket, boots, gloves. We want to make sure they’re dressed for winter, and then they give us their wish list and sizes. We usually get all of them socks and underwear.” Hicks said.

Hicks enlists local families and individuals to adopt families in need for Christmas. Groups can also volunteer. A local running group has adopted a family every year since the program began. The Police Department, the Courts, and City Hall have also adopted a family.

To help purchase items for the program, the FYA has included a budget of $4,000 to use for Christmas, and as an emergency fund. Last year the program provided Christmas for 38 kids and Hicks is expecting 45-to-50 kids this year.

THE CHRISTMAS PROGRAM IS JUST ONE OF THE MANY WAYS the FYA is striving to serve youth and their families. The FYA has two facets: The casework side and also the community organizational side. Hicks is the go-to person for all the planning and programming at FYA. The Oakland County Circuit Court funds Hanson’s salary as the caseworker. The school district provides the FYA space and also provides some funding as well. Finally, Ferndale and Pleasant Ridge provide monetary donations, as well as the community members.

Having their office located inside the high school makes it easier for Hicks to connect with the youth. “Community members – usually the school district, social workers, principals, assistant principals – make referrals of kids that are struggling. Then I meet with them on a short-term case basis and get them to where they need to be for counseling or groups or whatever they need. So, short-term casework services for kids who are struggling with things like death, dying, bullying, anxiety (and) depression,” Hanson said.

Being able to provide kids with toys on Christmas is a blessing, and it’s also Hanson and Hicks’ favorite part of the job. They’ve both lived in Ferndale for years, Hicks all of her life. Providing services for youth is their way of giving back and continuing the tradition of making Ferndale a great place to live.

To adopt a family this Christmas, contact Hicks at (248) 586-8700 or email melinda.hicks@ferndaleschools.org.

By Sarah E. Teller

FOR MORE THAN 100 YEARS NOW, THE CHURCH AT 1841 PINECREST DRIVE has been serving Ferndale’s spiritual needs, originally as the First Baptist Church and now the Renaissance Vineyard Church. There has certainly been a lot of change over that time.

In 1915, a Highland Park parish branched out to the Ferndale area looking to reach a new population of believers, according to RVC founding pastor Jim Poole. For the next twelve years, the church expanded and began meeting in several different locations across town. “The pastor at the time was also the Superintendent of Ferndale Schools,” Poole said. “They met for a while all along the 9 Mile corridor.”

In 1927, the current location was built, and First Baptist Church officially took root in the community. Pool explained, “Like lots of groups over the years, it has experienced ups and downs. There was growth in the area post World War II. So, the church expanded in the 1950s. Then people moved away, or the nature of their religious engagement changed some. It entered decline and was looking at the possibility of closing the doors.”

INSTEAD, HOWEVER, IN 2011, First Baptist Church merged with Royal Oak Vineyard Church, a parish that was started in 2001 by Poole, his wife, and another partner. Poole moved his congregation over and the name changed to Renaissance Vineyard Church.

“Many of our members were already living in Ferndale,” Poole said. “We drafted a proposal for the plan we had so both congregations could vote, and the majority were in favor.”

By merging the two into one, immediately there were more helping hands for many of the services the church offered to residents. “We have a heart for this city and its community, for serving others and fostering relationships.” Poole said.

Of course, there were some roadblocks along the way. “In the beginning, we were running around 100 miles-per-hour to figure out the details and how to keep up,” he added. “It was pretty challenging. But the way I look at it, we could have nit-picked the process to death or we could just trust the plan. We had enough clarity to move through it.”

NOW, THERE ARE MANY MEMBERS who have been there for decades, and equally as many newcomers. Poole explained, “There is a pretty steady group who have been here anywhere from 20 to 50 years, but there were also a lot of new, young families. Our nursery is exploding.” He added, “Attendance-wise, there are about 100 adults and children and there are roughly 200 people who self-identify this as being their home church.”

At the 100-year celebration, Renaissance requested words of encouragement and blessings from Ferndale Schools, the Chamber of Commerce, and the City of Ferndale, as well as its community network groups and those who have oversight responsibilities. “They submitted letters and videos,” Poole said. “The Mayor tagged us in a Facebook post.”

They also had four members share their testimonies. “Janet (Carpenter) has been here 65 years. Her mom was the church secretary. She talked about her rich legacy of service work at the church, with the highlight being a mission trip I took her on to Ethiopia. It was great hearing her feedback and how she’s looking forward to the next chapter. Bob (Latta) has held almost every position at the church, except pastor. He started coming here when he was eight, and remembers as a 10-year-old boy, shoveling coal with his father after Saturday night’s dinner for service the following morning. He’s 88 now.”

Carpenter said, “I always felt like the church was my second family. I had my real family, and this was my spiritual family. I’ve gotten a lot of moral and spiritual support both within the church and outside of the church – it’s been a strong crutch.”

CARPENTER FEELS MERGING THE TWO CONGREGATIONS WAS A GREAT MOVE, saying, “We’ve been a mission-minded church from day one, and because of the similarities of the mission outreach, it was a good marriage.” Of the Ethiopia trip, she said, “I never thought I’d have the opportunity, and I was skeptical at first, then finally said I would do it. I’ve never regretted it. It was the best experience.”

Of the celebration service, Poole continued, “There were also two other testimonies from newer, younger members who have been blessed and impacted by the church. The rest of the service was a more celebratory version of the normal service.”

Renaissance offered a free lunch. “The luncheon consisted of all home-cooked meals with an international fair. People lingered to look at our photo books and old and new memorabilia. What stood out was that they stayed for hours, just hanging out, and you got a sense that they were mixing and meeting new people.”

Renaissance Vineyard Church is involved in numerous community outreach programs, but Poole said it’s the church’s presence in the community and how this resonates with others that truly matters.

“We want to exist for the community, for others – not just serving others and ourselves. This program is part of it but it’s more about presence and the way we go about doing these things,” he said.

As far as future plans, Poole added, “I am looking forward to the future while leaning on the legacy of the past. We’re looking to continue to find ways to serve more faithfully and we’ll be doing some fundraising for facility repairs and expanding our ministry and missions.”

By: Sara E. Teller

PLANS ARE BEING FINALIZED FOR FERNDALE’S NEW SKATEPARK, which the City is hoping to roll out in the Spring. Ferndale’s City Council, Department of Parks and Recreation, and Department of Public Works have been busy working out the logistics and soliciting feedback from area residents. So far, they’ve secured help from Detroit’s architectural firm Hamilton Anderson, the Community Skatepark Advisory Committee, and the Tony Hawk Foundation, and a few changes have been made along the way.

“At this time, the location of the skatepark has not been confirmed. Previous plans of a pre-fabricated skatepark was set within Wilson Park. Based on the community feedback we received, we are now building a concrete skatepark,” said LeReina Wheeler, Parks and Recreation Director. “At the Parks and Recreation Department, we have been doing our due diligence, investigating and researching all potential viable locations for the skatepark. Data to assist with selecting the best location is being collected from skatepark designers, architectural personnel, skatepark professionals, City departments, and resident surveys.”

A design meeting was held on August 29th at B. Nektar Meadery, 1511 Jarvis, Ferndale. “There were attendees from both the skateboarding and non-skateboarding community [there],” said Wheeler.

“With the support of our architectural firm Hamilton Anderson, we presented examples of community skateparks within our region and asked for feedback on what elements were desirable, and which elements would not work in our community. The discussion and feedback provided an overview of what we would like to include in our Request for Proposal for a skatepark designer.”

Attendees were able to have a little hands-on fun at the meeting’s conclusion. “At the end of the meeting Brad Dahlhofer of B. Nektar extended an invitation to the participants to check out and skate his mini-ramp. Several skateboarders took the opportunity to show off on the mini-pipe,” Wheeler said. She confirmed the parties are still searching for a contractor to take on the design of the project.

“We are currently developing the RFP (Request For Proposal) for design-build. It should be published by late October or early November,” she said, adding, “With the support of Hamilton Anderson, we have been working on gathering preliminary information on what elements our community members want incorporated in the skatepark. Concept designs will be developed after we hire a skatepark design firm and confirm the final location of the skatepark. Additional community design meetings will be held to assist with the development of the final concept design.”

A separate meeting was hosted by the Parks and Recreation Department on September 5th, as well. The Department presented information to the Ferndale PARC Board regarding the viability of potential site locations. The meeting was open to the public and resulted in the recommendation of the top three potential site locations, ranked in order of most preferred: 1) Wilson Park, 2) Martin Rd Park, and 3) Geary Park.

“The recommendation was unanimously supported by the PARC Board,” Wheeler said. “Once the skatepark designer is hired, the Parks and Recreation Department will get input from the designer and make a final skatepark location recommendation to City Council for approval.”

She added, “The City is excited to bring this new amenity to our residents. We want our skatepark to be one of a kind and cater to all levels and abilities. Our residents have waited long enough and deserve the best when it comes to new amenities in our parks.”

More information on skatepark grants available from the Tony Hawk Foundation can be found at www.tonyhawkfoundation.org. Information regarding Ferndale’s new skatepark project, upcoming meetings, and project status can be found on the City of Ferndale’s website, www.cityofferndale.org.

By: Jeff Milo, Circulation Specialist

HALLOWEEN: OUR FAVORITE TIME OF YEAR IS GETTING NEAR! The library has always opened its doors on the last weekend before All Hallow’s Eve for a kid-friendly party – but we’ve particularly taken things up a notch over the last five years, and we’re always changing things up with a new, fun theme for our staff costumes.

This year’s Ferndale Library Spooktacular is Saturday Oct. 27 (5:00-7:00 P.M.), embracing a Charlie Brown-esque theme of a “Great Pumpkin Party!” In fact, to follow through on the nostalgia factor, this year’s theme will be iconic characters from children’s literature!” So, think Charlotte’s Web, Bunnicula, or Willy Wonka…, you’re sure to see some familiar faces from your favorite books! Join us for cider and donuts, crafts and games for kids, and a chance to trick-or-treat through the library!It’s free, and no registration is required.

ONE THOUSAND BOOKS BEFORE KINDERGARTEN: We’re inviting families to win prizes for every 100 books they complete with their toddlers (or babies) during the “1,000 Books Before Kindergarten” early literacy program. This nation-wide challenge encourages parents and caregivers to regularly read aloud to their children; it’s a fun and effective way for parents to assure their little ones are ready for kindergarten. The simple and enjoyable act of sharing a book with a child before they start kindergarten helps them learn pre-reading skills, such as understanding the sounds letters make, developing a bigger vocabulary, and building comprehension skills. Participants are eligible right up until the day their child starts kindergarten. Prizes (for every 100 completed books) will be awarded in the Kids Corner, and we’ll also add a leaf to our Reading Tree.

NEW STORYTIME: Saplings! We’re continuing our tree themed storytime titles with the unveiling of “Saplings.” Joining our family tree, along with “Sprouts,” “Buds” and “Uprooted,” we’ve got a new interactive storytime (for ages 3-6) that will be hosted in the evenings. For parents who aren’t able to make it to our morning storytimes, we’ll host the “Saplings” events on the third Monday of every month. “Saplings” will also have an age-appropriate craft-focused program on the third Saturday of every month. No registration will be required for either event. We’ll start “Saplings” with a storytime on Mon., Oct. 15th at 6:30 P.M., followed by the first crafts program on Sat., Oct. 20 at 2:00 P.M.

COMING UP IN OCTOBER: The Clean Water Campaign (CWC) for Michigan will be here on Thursday, Oct. 25 (6:30-8:00 P.M.). The CWC uses music and storytelling to spread awareness, and builds an informed constituency around clean water issues.

Then, just before Halloween, on Oct. 30 (4:00-8:00 PM) the Book Club of Detroit will be celebrating the 200th Anniversary of Frankenstein’s print edition with a screening of the original film, discussions about Mary Shelley’s immortal novel, and a fun costume contest. We’ll also have a new art exhibition by Ferndale High School graduate and Artist In You finalist Espacia Fotiu, on display through Nov. 5th.

COMING UP IN NOVEMBER:
First Stop Friday live music series: Nov. 2, 7:30-9:30 P.M.
Adulting 101: Money Milestones (Budgeting for the Big Stuff) Nov. 8, 6:30-8:00 P.M;
Songwriting Workshop with Jill Jack, Nov, 13, 6:30-8:00 P.M..
For more information, follow us on Facebook: facebook.com/FerndalePublicLibrary/.

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HELP STILL WANTED: Physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners. Do you have three hours a month to volunteer in the fabulous FernCare Free Clinic? You can be retired but need to have kept your practicing license current.

Upcoming clinic sessions:
Saturday mornings 9:00 to Noon : Oct. 20/Nov. 3/Nov. 21/Dec. 4.
Thursday evenings 6:00–8:30 : P.M.: Oct. 11/Oct. 25/Nov. 8/Dec. 6/Dec. 20.

If you have any questions, e-mail our Head Nurse, Diane Dengate at dengate436@aol.com or go to www.ferncare.org and pull down the Volunteers tab, complete the application and send it to Diane.

Lift a glass of a charming fall red wine or a great bubbly! Leon & Lulu is once again hosting a huge fund-raiser for us on Nov. 18, Sunday all day. FernCare volunteers will be there from 1:00 to 4:30 P.M. with finger foods from Dino’s Catering and, once again, three great wines for tasting. Amanda Wahl always finds wines that are spectacular. This is our seventh year with Leon & Lulu, please come by. Leon & Lulu 96 W. 14 Mile Road, Clawson 48017.

FernCare is still scheduling new patient appointments a month out, call 248-677-2273. If you cannot wait that long, there are two free clinics with available appointments much sooner than that:
Bernstein Community Health Clinic, 45580 Woodward Ave., Pontiac MI 48341, 248-309-3752.
HUDA Clinic, 13420 Woodrow Wilson, Detroit MI 48213, 313-444-5490.

If you need more resources, please call the clinic and ask for Carolyn Barr. She has the lists of all the free clinics and the services they offer in the area.

A local sliding fee scale clinic is Covenant Care Clinic at 27776 Woodward, Royal Oak MI 48067, 248-556-4900 across the street from the Westborn Market. It’s a full-service clinic and open 40 hours a week. They take Healthy Michigan and Medicaid-insured patients, as well as other insurances. They also have dental services at their clinic on Detroit’s East Side.

MEDICATION/MEDICAL EQUIPMENT COLLECTION: Bring medications and some equipment (see list below) to the Clinic on either the first or third Saturday of each month or anytime weekdays between 9:00 A.M. and 2:00 P.M. We take medications only from people not medical clinics, physician’s offices or nursing homes. Of course we will continue to take medications and the medical supplies below from churches and social groups that collect from their members.

FernCare now only accepts:
Vision and hearing aids equipment.
No-longer-used medications.
Small medication vials. No opaque vials and bottles.
Disposable diapers, all sizes.
Disposable bed liners, all sizes.

Take controlled substances, psychotropic medications or muscle relax-ants to the Ferndale Police, 310 E. Nine Mile in Ferndale. They have a collection receptacle in the lobby.

You can always take medical equipment to World Medical Relief, 21725 Melrose Ave. in Southfield MI 48075, 313-866-5333, one block north of 8 Mile at Lahser. Any very heavy equipment. Hospital beds, for example, can be picked up at no cost to you by World Medical Relief.

By Andrea G.
Photos By Bernie LaFramboise

THIS YEAR, HOWE’S BAYOU IS CELEBRAT­ING ITS 20TH YEAR OF CREOLE CUISINE ON WOODWARD A VENUE. The Ferndale classic is known for their New Orlean’s-inspired decor and menu. The restaurant offers a transportive experience, with each visit featuring rotating food specials and specialty cocktails.

As one of Ferndale’s longest operational restaurants on Woodward, the Howe’s Bayou family has watched Ferndale grow around them. Owner Michael Hennes has been running the restaurant since nearly the beginning, after taking over for the original owner a year and a half into operations. Although he was working at a nonprofit at the time, Hennes took an inspiring trip to New Orleans which helped make his decision to take on the restaurant. Hennes calls it a pleasure to be among Ferndale’s unique dining options and to watch the city blossom from within the heart
of it.

The restaurant has a low turn-over rate, with many employees spending years on the team delivering deliciousness. One employee in particular, Will Webb, has been with the restaurant since opening day, working as an integral part of the Howe’s Bayou kitchen. The low turn-over rate is a sign of a great place to work, but also a sign that the entire staff has combined their talents to create a family dynamic. The team effort of coming up with new treats and sustaining the welcoming atmosphere helps make Howe’s Bayou stand out amongst neighboring restaurants. The accommodating service is consistently cited as one of the highlights of visiting.

Howe’s Bayou focuses on famously New Orleans dishes – gumbo, jambalaya, catfish, po-boys, and don’t forget about the shrimp. Homemade lobster bisque is among the rotating selection of fresh seafood. Their incredible bar comes up with seasonal creative craft cocktails, especially focused on bourbons and ryes. Louisiana beers and boutique wines are also available to pair with the southern dishes.

The restaurant doesn’t have a specific date for an anniversary, so they will celebrate their 20th year of operation with events and specials throughout the rest of the year. Watch the restaurant’s web site, www.howesbayouferndale.net and their Facebook page for announcements of what is in the works. They are open for lunch and dinner and offer a happy hour Monday through Sunday from 4:00 to 6:00 P.M. As Michigan cools down into winter, you can always warm up at Howe’s Bayou.

By Ingrid Sjostrand

THE HAZEL PARK CREATIVE ARTS ORGANIZATION IS DETERMINED to give students access to quality art education and they have made impressive strides in the little over four years they’ve been in operation.

Since late 2014, the 501c3 has raised over $25,000 for supplies and equipment for K-12 students in Hazel Park schools. This includes replacing the high school’s pottery kiln in 2016 and their auditorium’s lighting console in February 2018 – just in time for the annual school play.

President Mike Vanderveer says the group was inspired to create Hazel Park Creative Arts after realizing there was a booster group raising money for the high school band, but the other arts programs were lacking funding.

“We want the school arts programs to continue at their highest possible level, especially with the current financial state of schools in general, and particularly the Hazel Park district,” Vanderveer says. “That’s why we took on projects like replacing the 30-year-old pottery kiln in the high school. We firmly believed at the time that had we not done so there might not be a ceramics program in the school in the future. We’re still of the same opinion to-day, not only in ceramics, but in many of the art programs within the district.”

Vanderveer leads the volunteer board of four members, which includes Vice President Bethany Holland, Secretary Lisa Chrouch-Johnson and Treasurer Robbie Webb. All money raised by the group comes from their extensive fundraising efforts. This includes an annual dinner in the fall and a spring night out event.

THE 2018 FALL DINNER WAS HELD on Friday, October 5th at the Hazel Park Junior High and is the biggest fundraising event for HP Creative Arts. The event featured a silent auction, basket raffles, a 50/50 drawing and a barbeque dinner. Sponsors for the event included Go Comedy! Improv Theater, The Henry Ford, Arthur Murray Royal Oak, The Fifth Wall Society Escape Room and more.

While their focus is in the Hazel Park district, the nonprofit hopes their efforts impact all through metro Detroit.

“It benefits not just Hazel Park students, really it’s all the kids. We want them all to grow up to be healthy, happy and successful. I strongly feel that the arts are important to that and I’ve seen it first hand,” Vice President Holland says. “Additionally, many Ferndale residents have students in Hazel Park schools.”

“With luck, our efforts to encourage a love of the arts in the school district may inspire a young budding artist to contribute to the arts in the community as well,” Vanderveer adds.

HAZEL PARK CREATIVE ARTS is currently working with the school district to determine their next major funding project and in the meantime is focusing on their community engagement efforts and gaining some long-term sponsors.

“If there is anyone out there that would like to regularly donate, we are tax deductible. There might be individuals, businesses or church groups – any group –that want to support us and are welcomed,” Treasurer Webb says. “There is a need and that money would be used in helping kids.”

For more information on donating, getting involved or attending a board meeting with Hazel Park Creative Arts, visit their web site at hpcreativearts.org.