Special

HAZEL PARK OFFERS SOME GREAT PROGRAMS IN WHICH PARENTS CAN POSITION THEIR CHILDREN FOR ACADEMIC SUCCESS prior to enrollment in traditional kindergarten. The programs are housed in the Webster Early Childhood Center, Hoover Elementary School, Webb Elementary, and there are a variety of options available for families looking for best-fit solutions.

“Here at Hazel Park, we strongly believe in the power and impact of early education,” said Stephanie Dulmage, Ed. S., Director of 21st Century Learning. Initiatives such as Early Fives, the Great Start Readiness Grant Program (GSRP), Head Start and Early Head Start strongly reflects the district’s mission.

GSRP is a State of Michigan-funded grant program that provides full-day tuition free education to preschool students for four days per week from September to June. The program services families in Oakland, Wayne, and Macomb counties, and follows a research-based HighScope curriculum designed to best position students for future success.

We also have the privilege of housing Head Start in Webster Elementary School. While this is not a Hazel Park-run program, families are able to access this program right here in our community for their students.

“The Early Fives program,” explained Dulmage, “is open to children who are kindergarten-aged, but not quite ready for enrollment or have birthdays after the cut-off date. The classrooms offer highly-skilled, personalized learning opportunities with kindergarten curriculum in which students are given two years to learn and grow.” Not every student follows the standard two-year path, however. “Some of our Early Fives do very well and are placed right into first grade after one year,” she said.

The Early Fives program is designed to ensure students are keeping pace with their peers. “This gives parents and kids a great option to have a slightly different pacing to develop their learning,” said Dulmage. “They are placed in a smaller setting with individualized learning based on their growth needs. This way, we can really meet them where they are.”

She added, “There are several ways in which children are identified for participation in Early Fives. Either, they have a birthday after the cut-off date or parents just know about the program and are really excited about it. They want their children to participate. We also work to support those who would benefit from Early Fives based on their performance in the Webster Early Childhood Center.”

With a variety of early learning program offerings, the district encourages families to start their children’s education at a young age, so they’re best positioned for future success. Dulmage explained, “Hazel Park School District values early education and we try to provide students with as many opportunities as possible.”

MI EXCEL WORK IS A STATEWIDE SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT INITIATIVE designed to fill in student achievement gaps, and ensure students are receiving a top-notch education across the board by narrowing in on the school that needs it the most.

“We joined the MI Excel (Blueprint) work in December of 2015,” explained Corri Nastasi, Hazel Park’s Webb Elementary School Principal. “Our district was invited to learn about this work due to the fact that at the time we had a school – Hoover Elementary – on the Focus Schools list for the state.”

School Board Trustee, Rachel Noth added, “Three years ago we had a district that was struggling. We had found out that we were in deficit, central office staff had resigned, and we had to think about the future of our District.

During that time, we worked with Oakland Schools and the State of Michigan to get a deficit elimination plan together. Once that was set, we then went through the grueling process of hiring a superintendent. Fortunately, we were able to find Dr. Amy Kruppe. Dr. Kruppe and some of our staff went to a conference where Grant Chandler was speaking about MI Excel. When they came back they were really inspired about the program, and knew that it could help our District. From there, the board adopted the MI Excel framework.”

In order to bring the curriculum up to state standards at Hoover by building capacity needed to increase student achievement and decrease achievement gaps, administrators decided to implement MI Excel. “The work we are doing involves an overhaul of how we do business – a systemic reconfiguration,” Nastasi explained. “MI Excel has developed a blueprint of systems that are proven through research to be effective. There is a specific plan for different stages throughout the implementation process. The focus is to put systems in place that will help us more effectively provide quality education for our students.”

Board President, Laura Adkins, said, “Thankfully Hoover Elementary is no longer a Focus School, but we are continuing to use MI Excel. The District has had a lot of change during the last few years, and implementing this program has definitely contributed to that. The School Board is excited about the progress that the Hazel Park School District is making.”

Specific goals for Hazel Park’s district include a desire “to put systems and procedures in place to improve the quality of our work in the district in a short amount of time. The ultimate goal is to increase student achievement for our students,” according to Nastasi.

Unfortunately, because of the aggressive timeline proposed to reconfigure current systems and the complications that come along with overhauling existing processes, the District has realized a few challenges along the way.

“​There have been some minor setbacks as we push forward to do this hard work in a short amount of time. Many times it involves us going back and reviewing some things or improving procedures,” Nastasi explained, but added that staff realizes it’s important to implement change.

“This program is important to all staff because it helps our district function as a complete system, so whichever building you are working at will have the same procedures policies and systems in place. It also provides a predictable structure for how we do business. K-12 curriculum and assessments have been written and are updated yearly based on ​teacher feedback,” she said.

By rolling out MI Excel, Hazel Park will operate more consistently as a district, and this consistency helps ease information flow and ensure that all students are receiving the same educational standards. Nastasi said, “All of the buildings are on the same page. There is much more consistency across our systems. There is more discussion about the importance of teaching and learning. Teachers and administrators work together to improve instruction on a regular basis. We are more tuned in to not only the academic needs, but also the non-academic needs of students.”

Asked what the future of using MI Excel within Hazel Park’s schools looks like, Nastasi explained, “​We are currently using the MI Excel framework as we do the work of teaching and learning on a regular basis. This was rolled out in January of 2016 and has been a continuous work in progress. The future of this framework involves a consistent process​for utilizing the framework, collecting data from students, community members, and staff, and making updates and improvements to the systems as needed. The ideal future is that all systems are in place and being utilized confidently by all Hazel Park stakeholders for the continued success of our students and families.”

For more information on MI Excel Works, please visit the Department of Education at www.michigan.gov and visit the MI Excel Resource Center at
www.miexcelresourcecenter.org

THE UAW SCHOOL TO WORK OPTION STARTED THREE YEARS AGO with Hazel Park’s first group graduating this past June. “The School to Work program was estab-lished via our Promise Zone coordinator Kayla Roney,” explained Hazel Park’s Director of Curriculum Integration and Instruction, Dr. Carla Postell. “Chrysler came to our partner to offer the program and worked with Kayla to shape it. This allows for students to determine their future if they are interested in going into skilled trades. There are five or six skilled trades available for them to learn.”

The UAW School to Work program is a two-year offering in which students have an opportunity to attend hands-on classes outside of the normal classroom setting at the UAW training site off of 9 Mile Rd. in Warren. “They learn soft skills during the first year, then it’s more hands-on during the second as they really dig into the trades,” Dr. Postell said. “So, they’ll learn about things such as workplace safety and health, the manufacturing process, and look at equipment, then delve into mechanical engineering, welding, electrical, and so forth.” She added, “Students essentially have an opportunity to get the same exposure as candidates would in the full-time Chrysler program. They’re able to put this on their resume, and will receive a certificate of completion and honor cords once successfully graduating from the program.”

During their eleventh-grade year, every student in the Hazel Park district has an opportunity to tour Chrysler’s facility. They can then choose to complete an application and write an essay if they are interested, and participate in an interview process. “Those selected will go to the Warren location during the second half of their junior year for half a day each day during the week. This is something available to alternative education as well as high school students.”

Steve Nemeckay, Principal at Hazel Park Advantage, said two of his students really stood out. “The first student that comes to mind is Marcus White. Marcus graduated this year and while attending the Chrysler/UAW program he had perfect attendance for two consecutive years. He received two awards for his attendance and often volunteered to help with any school activity that we had. The second student is Thomas Emmons. He also graduated this year after attending the Chrysler/UAW program the last two years. Thomas was the leader among the Chrysler/UAW students – both HPHS and Advantage students. He earned an award as outstanding student of the social studies department.”

According to Dr. Postell, Chrysler informs their students that they can also choose to apply directly through the company website but choosing to do so through their school is potentially a more lucrative option, because the skills students learn are transferable, and they can use their credentials to be placed at other companies as well.

Dr. Postell offered, “Every year, the number of Hazel Park students attending has increased. The first year we had approximately fifteen or sixteen members, and this past year was our largest yet. Roughly twenty-five to thirty students, in total, are selected.”

 

THE HAZEL PARK SCHOOL DISTRICT IS ACTIVELY BUILDING a K-12 STEM pathway through a variety of programs and initiatives. The STEM acronym represents Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math, and encompasses the processes of critical thinking, creativity, and collaboration. Students integrate processes and concepts in these areas necessary for college and career success.

This past year, Hazel Park instituted STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math) time for all K-5 students at least one to two times per week. “The K-5 program exposes the students to the fundamentals of programming and coding and teaches them the design-thinking process. We have a 3D printer in all environments and teach them basic CAD skills,” said Stephanie Dulmage, Director of 21st Century Learning.
By the time students reach junior high, “they have the opportunity to participate in a technology and media literacy class. In this class, they do programming and coding, learn how to navigate digital media, and develop other technology-related skills. They work with Google applications and use these tools to support and extend their learning,” Dulmage explained.

She added, “We believe so strongly in immersing students in STEM learning opportunities that all sixth, seventh and eighth grade students participate in two Project Lead The Way courses each year. All courses are related to science and engineering.” Project Lead The Way courses provide a project-based curriculum that develops technical, science, creativity, communication, and collaboration skills.

THIS PAST YEAR, HAZEL PARK EXPANDED STEM offerings to include FIRST Robotics. FIRST is an international program that offers students an opportunity to develop technology, engineering, and robotics skills which help foster confidence, leadership skills, and innovation. Teams were implemented at United Oaks, Hazel Park Junior High, and Hazel Park High School. “Our goal is to expand to all elementary buildings during the 2018-2019 school year,” said Dulmage.

K-5 students at United Oaks Elementary School had the opportunity to be part of the FIRST LEGO League, in which they were given a challenge and had to respond by building a robot capable of solving the game challenge, and develop a research project. This year’s challenge focused on water – how to find, transport, use, or dispose of it. After receiving some background information on the city’s water system from Hazel Park’s Department of Public Works (DPW), students developed a prototype capable of demonstrating filtration and an innovative approach to water purification. The team placed well at the competition and were honored for their efforts at the June 26 City Council meeting.

At the Junior High, students who are part of the FIRST Tech Challenge team are building problem-solving prototypes based on their interpretation of challenge guidelines and rules. This year’s rookie team successfully built a competition-ready robot.

HAZEL PARK HIGH SCHOOL HAS OFFERED a Robotics Club for several years, providing students with hands-on experience in math, science, robotics, and engineering. Students in the club participate in a variety of competitions including the Square One Autonomous Innovative Vehicle Design, Sea Perch, and Robofest at LTU. The team attended two events during their first go-round and ended the season with a solid performance.
The High School will also offer a business-focused program next year designed to position students well post-graduation. “Next year, Hazel Park High School will offer a LEAN fundamentals course as well. Lean Manufacturing is a way to improve paradigms through critical thinking and reflection, and to improve processes through piloting of ideas and solutions. The Lean Fundamentals course provides high school students with real-world applications of skills in mathematics, process engineering, problem-solving, observation, entrepreneurship, marketing, and inventory control.” Students will receive a Lean Fundamentals Certificate of Completion as part of the successful completion of this course.

MICHIGAN’S INTEGRATED BEHAVIOR AND LEARNING SUPPORT INITIATIVE (MIBLSI) IS A STATE-AND FEDERALLY- FUNDED PROJECT. MIBLSI helps intermediate and local school districts implement and sustain a multi-tier system of supports (MTSS) in their schools to improve student outcomes in behavior and learning. The purpose is to provide support within the district as a whole as well as in each building by installing Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS).

“I am the coordinator for the behavior part of the program, which is called Promoting Positive School Climate,” said Dr. Michelle Krause, Hazel Park’s Supervisor of Special Education. The Promoting Positive School Climate (PPSC) program helps districts focused on utilizing behavioral resources.

“The process begins by installing a District leadership team who will then support building level teams,” explained Dr. Krause. “The installation of the leadership team began late last year and continued into this year. Part of that team’s job was to identify individuals at each building who would take on the role of PBIS trainer and coach. Second, was for each building to identify PBIS building level leadership teams who would support their building in the implementation process. The trainers and coaches were identified, trained, and then came back to the district to train the building level teams.”

This year Hazel Park had four training sessions and the focus was on developing Tier 1 interventions and supports. Buildings identified behavior expectations for all students and developed how those expectations would be acknowledged. A formal kickoff occurred in January in which students were taught expectations in each area of their buildings.

Next year, Hazel Park will begin focusing on Tier 2 and Tier 3 interventions for those who need more individualized attention. These may include a check-in, check-out system in which a student is paired with an adult who acts as their support. It may also involve developing individual behavior plans.

“As we proceed with implementation, the coaches support teachers in the classroom to assist in using the building-wide system to build a classroom management system,” Dr. Krause said. “Additionally, all buildings use the School-wide Information System (SWIS) which allows tracking of behavioral referrals so that we can access that data at any point in time and use it to adjust what we are doing both as a district as well as in individual schools.”

The program is reviewed on an ongoing basis to ensure it is progressing as expected. “We regularly review progress in implementation and behavioral data with our board of education. Each building holds monthly building leadership team meetings to discuss student data and see if there are any areas that need adjustment or revision,” said Dr. Krause.

EDISON MAX, ALSO REFERRED TO AS “ED MAX,” IS A CENTER PROGRAM OPERATED BY THE HAZEL PARK SCHOOL DISTRICT ON BEHALF THE OAKLAND INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL DISTRICT (ISD), which serves students across Oakland County with emotional and behavioral disabilities.

The program is staffed with Hazel Park teachers, social workers, psychologists, occupational therapists, speech and language therapists, and support staff who not only help students in their home district but in areas such as Avondale, Bloomfield Hills, Birmingham, Clawson, Berkley, Ferndale, Oak Park, Madison Heights, Royal Oak, South Lyon, Walled Lake and West Bloomfield.

“We serve students in approximately 18 different districts within Oakland County. Our building is K-12, and has been housed in the Edison building since 2002,” explained Dr. Michelle Krause, Hazel Park’s Supervisor of Special Education.
“Prior to that, the high school part of the program was located at Hazel Park High, and the junior high and elementary programs were located at the former Beecher Jr. High building.”

Dr. Krause noted since the move very little has been done in the way of renovation or updates. “The building was built in the ‘50s and has needed work both cosmetically and mechanically,” she said. “About two years ago there was conversation at the ISD level that Edison needed to be more on par with our counterpart in the north, Kingsley Montgomery Center, which is located in Waterford and serves the northern district. Kingsley had a major renovation about seven years ago.”

THERE WERE MANY STEPS THAT NEEDED TO BE TAKEN BY THE DISTRICT to get the project approved, but Hazel Park accomplished these late in 2017 as a result of the support of both the ISD as well as the superintendents of Oakland County Schools. The project will involve a complete renovation of the existing building as well as the addition of square footage to serve students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) as well as students aged 18-26 who have emotional disabilities.

“All furnishings will be new, and we will be adding several additional rooms such as an upgraded sensory room, a life skills room, a STEM lab and greenhouse,” Dr. Krause explained.

These programs will be temporarily housed in a separate location for the upcoming school year, but construction will finalize the following year. “The project timeline was for our program to be moved to a temporary location for the 2018-2019 school year during which construction would start at Edison. Construction would then be completed over the next year with a scheduled return to Edison for the 2019-2020 school year,” she said, noting everyone has had the ability to get involved in rolling out the Ed MAX program.

She said, “Throughout the process all stakeholders have been involved in the decision making. I was able to identify a school team to sit in meetings with architects, construction managers, and interior designers so that we could get input from the professionals who will actually utilize the building. It has been a very interesting process, and staff and students alike are extremely excited for the upcoming changes we will have in our new building.”

HAZEL PARK HAS RECENTLY EXPANDED ITS ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) COURSE OFFERINGS TO STUDENTS. DOCTOR CARLA POSTELL, DIRECTOR OF CURRICULUM INTEGRATION AND INSTRUCTION, SAID, “Originally, the district offered only two AP English classes – language and literature – and one class in the art program, because the rest were cut due to our limited budget.” However, she explained, “Within the last year or two, in addition to these three, we’ve been able to add AP psychology, biology, world history, government, and statistics.” The courses offered depend largely on student interest and funding.

Dr. Postell explained that the process for identifying students who qualify for AP course placement is two-fold. “Students can express interest on their own, and counselors often offer their recommendations and guidance. If a student is deter-mined to qualify for AP courses, their counselors will continue the process for placement.” Parents also tend to express interest in placing students when the school sends a form home with course offerings for the following year. “Parents are required to sign this, so they’ll review the card and ensure they’re taking what they need to,” she said. Students interested in advanced placement will then take an exam that will determine whether they can participate.

The AP program helps students develop cognitive skills necessary for success post-graduation. “Just having kids be able to extend their learning base and be able to leave with college credit is great and takes dollars off when they go to ap-ply for college,” said Dr. Postell.

Career and Technical Education (CTE) Courses
THE DISTRICT ALSO RECENTLY INCREASED ITS CTE COURSE OFFERINGS to include business education, digital media, and woodworking options.

“These are the three main umbrella areas under which various individual courses are offered,” explained Dr. Postell. “We’ve increased the program over the past two years. High school students are able to self-select for these.”

Students can also be nominated and identified for CTE county-wide programs, as well as recognized at an annual Oakland County banquet. They are recognized at the CTE Recognition Banquet and Conference through Oakland County Inter-mediate School District, which is held in May.

Some notable students who graduated from the program this year include:

• CHARLES GREY: Grey transformed during his time in the program and is looking at making a career in the skilled trades as a result of being in the program.
• MARCUS WHITE: White had perfect attendance for two consecutive years. He received two awards for his attendance and often volunteered to help with school activities.
• THOMAS EMMONS: Emmons was a leader among the Chrysler/UAW students (both HPHS and Advantage students). He earned an award as outstanding student of the social studies department.

HAZEL PARK OFFERS SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES AT ALL SCHOOLS. IN ADDITION TO SCHOOL-AGED SERVICES, THE DISTRICT ALSO OFFERS early childhood special education and early intervention options. According to Director of Student Services, Vita Lusk, “If a child is found eligible for special education services through the evaluation process, the team develops an Individualized Education Program (IEP) and determines the programs and/or services to be provided.” Some of these services include psycho-logical, speech and language, school social work, and occupational and physical therapy interventions.

Early intervention is “designed for children from birth to three years of age,” Lusk explained, while the early childhood program is a classroom-based option for children three to five years of age, and “addresses the developmental hierarchy of skills necessary for success in later formal education,” she said. There is also a resource room program, which provides assistance for eligible students who still spend a majority of time in a general education setting.

For students with cognitive impairment specifically, individualized instruction in classrooms taught by a special education teacher is offered so they can live independently later in life. For those with emotional impairment, classrooms with a small number of students are provided at the elementary and middle school levels, which focus on the development of appropriate behavior skills necessary to be successful in school and beyond. Students in both programs are provided with opportunities in a general setting, whenever appropriate. Students who qualify for Hazel Park’s autism spectrum disorder program are provided with individualized instruction focused on the development of communication, cognitive, social-emotional, self-help and vocational skills for older students.

THE HAZEL PARK SCHOOL DISTRICT ALSO OPERATES CENTER-BASED OPPORTUNITIES, which service students throughout Oakland County. Placement in these programs is determined by the Individualized Education Program Team (IEPT). Yet, because they are county-wide, residency in Hazel Park does not guarantee placement.

Edison is a center-based program for students with Emotional Impairment. The program focuses on the development of appropriate behavior skills necessary to be successful in school and beyond. Students are provided with opportunities in general education, when appropriate, to allow them to develop social skills in the environment in which they naturally occur.

Jardon has served special education students throughout Oakland County since 1966, who continue to qualify for adult transition services and programs after their senior year in high school that require specialized services to meet their adult transition needs. “Jardon’s program focuses on community integration, work experiences and adult living skills,” said Lusk. The program prepares students to successfully integrate into their communities of adult living, through an individualized program and curriculum. “Jardon has extensive partnerships with many local businesses and community agencies that support young adults with special needs,” she said, adding that the program “continues to look for partnerships to provide students with work experiences and community integration, and is also seeking partnerships to support restoration of programs that have previously provided students with additional skill development.”

For more information on Hazel Park’s special education opportunities and assistance, families are encouraged to call 248.658.5204.

APRIL
TUES. APRIL 24
• Ferndale Library: Tree Buds Infant Storytime, 2:00 PM
• GO! Comedy 8 PM: Launch Group Callbacks
• Eat Smart, Live Strong, Oak Park Recreation
• Gentle Chair Yoga: Oak Park Recreation, Noon
• Oak Park Library, It’s Story Time, Ages 2-6 10:30 AM
• Oak Park Library: Adult Coloring Club 6:00 PM
• Oak Park Library: Tournament Tuesdays 6:00 PM
• Detroit Fleat: Taco Tuesday with Guest trucks
• Ferndale Inclusion Network quarterly meeting 7 PM at Affirmations. Contact CFF48220@gmail.org

Weds. April 25
• Ferndale Library: Tree Sprouts Storytime, 10:30 AM
• Ferndale Pride Volunteer Meeting, 7-8 PM Kulick Ctr
• GO! Comedy 8PM: Beta Testing & Teachers Lounge; 9PM: Female Hysteria
• Oak Park Library: Steam Generation Creation; Mystery Project; 4:30 PM
• Detroit Fleat: Trivia Night

Thurs. April 26
• Ferndale Public Library: Uprooted Music and Movement, 10:30 AM
• GO! Comedy 8 PM: Skit Parade; 9 PM: Proving Grounds; 10 PM: Guess Who’s Coming to Puppet Street
• Oak Park Library: Family Game Night, 6:00 PM
• Oak Park Free Garage Sale Weekend 248-691-7450
• Andiamo, Royal Oak: Lorio Ross Industry Night 7:00-10:00 PM

Fri. April 27
• Ferndale Education Foundation Annual Dinner & Auction, 6-10:30 PM
https://fefoundation.wixsite.com/fefoundation
• GO! Comedy: 8 PM: Skit Parade w/op Reboot ($15); 10 PM: All-Star Showdown ($15)
• Magic Bag: Mega ’80s Prince Remembrance Show
• Oak Park Free Garage Sale Weekend 248-691-7450
• Oak Park Arbor Day Event 10 AM, Help plant trees at Best Park
• Detroit Fleat: Live Music 8 PM

Sat. April 28
• ART SHOW presented by the Hazel Park Library Friends and the Hazel Park Arts Council
• Ferndale Public Library: Sensory Saturdays, 2:00 P.M.
• FUEL’s Got Talent, Ferndale Upper Elementary School’s Talent Show on Saturday, 6:00 PM in the Ferndale High School Auditorium.
• Awesome Animal Storytime & Crafts with Cowboy Alex; 11AM – 12:00 pm, Royal Oak Senior Ctr
• Spring Fever Beer Fest Royal Oak Farmers Market
• GO! Comedy: 8 PM: All-Star Showdown ($18); 10 PM: All-Star Showdown ($18)
• Loving Touch, Tiles, Matthew Parmenter
• Oak Park Free Garage Sale Weekend 248-691-7450
• Detroit Fleat: Food Truck Rally, 12 PM-6 PM
• Hazel Park Community Coalition Drug Take-Back Day. 10 AM-2 PM, Hazel Park Police Dept.

Sun. April 29
• GO! Comedy: 7 PM: Sunday Buffet ($10): Hot Gold; Character Fondue; 9 PM: Fresh Sauce (Free)
• World Dance Day, Oak Park Community Center
• Oak Park Free Garage Sale Weekend 248-691-7450
• Oak Park Recreation Pitch Hit & Run, 10:00 AM 248-691-7555

Mon. April 30
• GO! Comedy: 8 PM: Class Show Alpha ($5)
• Heartfulness Meditation: Oak Park Library 6:30 PM
• Oak Park Library: Adult Computer Class, 9:00 AM
• Loaded Die, Rust Belt Market: Board Game Night

Tues. May 1
• Ferndale Library: Tree Buds Infant Storytime, 2:00 PM
• GO! Comedy: 8 PM: Class Show Bravo ($5)
• Eat Smart, Live Strong, Oak Park Recreation
• Gentle Chair Yoga: Oak Park Recreation, Noon
• Oak Park Library, It’s Story Time, Ages 2-6 10:30 AM
• Oak Park Library: Adult Coloring Club 6:00 PM
• Oak Park Library: Tournament Tuesdays, 6:00 PM
• Detroit Fleat: Taco Tuesday with guest trucks
• Citizens For A Fair Ferndale, Ferndale Library 6:30 PM

Weds. May 2
• Ferndale Library: Tree Sprouts Storytime, 10:30 AM
• Rosie O’ Grady’s 1st Wed. Tin Can Raffle, 7-11 PM, 279 W. Nine Mile Ferndale Pride
• Claddagh Chiropractic; 6:00-6:30 PM with Dr. Kyle Hawkins. Free information session and 3D foot scans
• GO! Comedy: 8 PM: Brown Sugar: The Diversity Jam
• Oak Park Public Safety Citizens Academy 6:00 PM
• Oak Park Library: Book Club, 6:00 PM
• Detroit Fleat: Trivia Night
• Evolve Acupuncture Ribbon Cutting, 5-7 PM, 3055 Hilton Rd Ste B

Thurs. May 3
• Ferndale Public Library: Uprooted Music and Movement, 10:30 AM
• GO! Comedy: 8 PM: Double Feature ($10) Taco Diaries & World Wrestling World; 10 PM: Guess Who’s Coming to Puppet Street ($10)
• Oak Park Library: Family Game Night, 6:00 PM

Fri. May 4
• GO! Comedy: 8 PM: Date night wsg (For Real) ($15); 10PM: Pandemonia ($15)
• Detroit Fleat: Live Music 8, PM

Sat. May 5
• Ferndale Public Library: Sensory Saturdays, 2:00 PM
• 1-3 p.m. Swing Into Health Open House. Claddagh Chiropractic
• Cinco Pub Crawl, Downtown Ferndale
• GO! Comedy: 8 PM: All-Star Showdown ($18); 10 PM: All-Star Showdown ($18)
• Detroit Fleat: Food Truck Face-Off, 12 PM-6 PM
• Citizens For A Fair Ferndale Bowling Fundraiser, Noon
• Hazel Park Neighborhood Enrichment Cinco De Mayo Fiesta Night Fundraiser 248-542-1247
• Group Bike Ride, Downtown Ferndale Bikes
• B Nektar’s Spring Mead Fest

Sun. May 6
• Hazel Park Memorial Museum open Noon – 4 PM
• GO! Comedy: 7 PM: Sunday Buffet: Hot Gold; (Reality Check); The Views; Bros Jacokes; 9 PM: Fresh Sauce
• Detroit Fleat: Food Truck Brunch, 11 AM
• Hazel Park Literacy Project Call or Walk for Literacy, Mabel Gray, 4-9 PM

Mon. May 7
• GO! Comedy: 7 PM: Class Show Charlie; 9 PM: Class Show Delta
• Heartfulness Meditation: Oak Park Library, 6:30 PM
• Oak Park Library: Adult Computer Class, 9:00 AM
• Loaded Die, Rust Belt Market: Board Game Night

Tues. May 8
• Ferndale Library: Tree Buds Infant Storytime, 2:00 PM
• Eat Smart, Live Strong, Oak Park Recreation
• Gentle Chair Yoga: Oak Park Recreation, Noon
• Oak Park Library, It’s Story Time, Ages 2-6 10:30 AM
• Oak Park Library: Adult Coloring Club, 6:00 PM
• Oak Park Library: Tournament Tuesdays, 6:00
• Detroit Fleat: Taco Tuesday with Guest trucks

Weds. May 9
• Ferndale Library: Tree Sprouts Storytime, 10:30 AM
• Ferndale Pride Volunteer Meeting, 7-8 PM Kulick Center, 1201 Livernois
• Claddagh Chiropractic Wellness Center, 6:00-6:30 PM Free Paleo and Ketogenic Diet information session
• Oak Park Public Safety Citizens Academy, 6:00 PM
• Detroit Fleat: Trivia Night
• Group Bike Night, Downtown Ferndale Bike, 6:30 PM

Thur. May 10
• Library ADULTING 101 Series Hair/Make-Up, 6:30 PM
• Ferndale Public Library: Uprooted Music and Movement, 10:30 AM
• GO! Comedy: 8 PM: Let’s Just Say; 10 PM: Guess Who’s Coming to Puppet Street
• Oak Park Library: Family Game Night, 6:00 PM

Fri. May 11
• Live Band Karaoke at Dino’s, 9:30 PM-2 AM, 22740 Woodward, Ferndale Pride event
• GO! Comedy: 8 PM: Character Fondue wsg (TBD); 10 PM: All-Star Showdown
• Magic Bag: Carry On: Crosby Stills Nash Young Tribute
• Berkley Art & About
• Detroit Fleat: Live Music, 8 PM

Sat. May 12
• Rock the Park Artist Bazaar presented by B.D.T. and the Hazel Park Arts Council, 21630 John R Rd
• Ferndale Public Library: Sensory Saturdays, 2:00 PM
• GO! Comedy: 8 PM: All-Star Showdown ($18); 10 PM: All-Star Showdown ($18)
• Detroit Fleat: Slooshie Bar, 6 different boozy slushees at the patio bar, 12-6 PM
• Super Brunch, 10-1 Kulick Community Center
• Group Bike Ride, The Fit Park

Sun. May 13
• Women Walking Woodward for Peace
• GO! Comedy: 4 PM: Family-Friendly Showdown; 7 PM: Sunday Buffet: Hot Gold; Taco Diaries; World Wrestling World; Dubalicious; 9 PM: Fresh Sauce
• Detroit Fleat: Food Truck Brunch, 11:00 AM

Mon. May 14
• Claddagh Chiropractic Wellness Center, 12:00-12:30 with Dr. Kyle Hawkins.
• Heartfulness Meditation: Oak Park Library 6:30
• Oak Park Library: Adult Computer Class, 9:00 AM

Tues. May 15
• Ferndale Public Library: Tree Buds Infant Storytime, 2:00 PM
• Ferndale Public Library: The Artist In You Reception
• Eat Smart, Live Strong, Oak Park Recreation
• Gentle Chair Yoga: Oak Park Recreation, Noon
• Oak Park Library, It’s Story Time, Ages 2-6 10:30 AM
• Oak Park Library: Adult Coloring Club, 6:00 PM
• Oak Park Library: Tournament Tuesdays, 6:00 PM
• Detroit Fleat: Taco Tuesday with Guest trucks

Weds. May 16
• Ferndale Library: Tree Sprouts Storytime, 10:30 AM
• GO! Comedy: 8 PM: The Fjord Twins’ Royal Wedding ($10); 9 PM: Female Hysteria ($10)
• Magic Bag: Josh Rouse 8 PM
• Oak Park Public Safety Citizens Academy 6:00 PM
• Detroit Fleat: Trivia Night

Thur. May 17
• Ferndale Public Library: Uprooted Music and Movement, 10:30 AM
• Ferndale Beautification Commission Monthly Meeting, 6:30 PM at the Ferndale Public Library
• GO! Comedy: 8 PM: Double Feature ($10) (Reality Check) The Views; 9 PM: Hot Takes ($10); 10 PM: Guess Who’s Coming to Puppet Street ($10)
• Oak Park Library: Family Game Night 6 PM
• Bike Rodeo: 4-8pm Schiffer Park, free
• Hazel Park Memorial Museum, open 6-8 PM

Fri. May 18
• Valentine Distilling Co. Tasting Room’s 7th Anniversary Party
• GO! Comedy 8 PM: Date Night wsg (For Real) ($15); 10PM: Pandemonia ($15)
• Detroit Fleat: Live Music, 8PM
• Bike To Work Day

Sat. May 19
• Ferndale Library: Sensory Saturdays, 2:00 P.M.
• Soho’s 5th Hot Daddies Contest, 8-11 PM, 205 W. Nine Mile, Ferndale Pride event
• Tequila Mundo, Royal Oak Farmers Market
• GO! Comedy: 8 PM: All-Star Showdown ($18); 10PM: All-Star Showdown ($18)
• Detroit Fleat: Disco Brunch with DJ Joe V., 11 AM – 4 PM. Brunch options from all food trucks.
• Julia’s Motor City Songbirds Festival VI, Port, 116 E Troy
• Pleasant Ridge Auction & Gala, pleasantridgefoundation.org
• Spring Perennial Exchange 9-11 AM, Blumz
• 7th Annual Clean The Ferndale Up, City Hall Parking Lot

Sun. May 20
• GO! Comedy: 7 PM: Sunday Buffet ($10): Hot Gold; Cash & Carry; (Quicksand); (Character Fondue); 9 PM: Fresh Sauce (Free)
• Detroit Fleat: Food Truck Brunch, 11 AM

Mon. May 21
• Heartfulness Meditation: Oak Park Library 6:30 PM
• Oak Park Library: Adult Computer Class 9:00 AM
• Loaded Die, Rust Belt Market: Board Game Night

Tues. May 22
• Ferndale Library: Tree Buds Infant Storytime, 2:00 PM
• Gentle Chair Yoga: Oak Park Recreation, Noon
• Oak Park Library, It’s Story Time, 2-6, 10:30 AM
• Oak Park Library: Adult Coloring Club 6:00 PM
• Oak Park Library: Tournament Tuesdays, 6:00
• Detroit Fleat: Taco Tuesday with Guest trucks
• Group Bike Ride, 6:30 PM

Weds. May 23
• Ferndale Library: Tree Sprouts Storytime, 10:30 AM
• Ferndale Pride Volunteer Meeting, 7-8 P.M. Kulick Center,1201 Livernois
• Otus Supply, doors at 8 p.m., 345 E. Nine Mile Ferndale Pride event
• Claddagh Chiropractic, 6-6:30 PM with Dr. Andrea Whedon. Whittle Your Middle
• GO! Comedy: 8 PM: BITS ($10); 9 PM: BITS ($10)
• Oak Park Public Safety Citizens Academy, 6:00 PM
• Detroit Fleat: Trivia Night
• Bicycling 101 Class, 6:30 PM, Ferndale Library

Thurs. May 24
• FernCare 10th Annual Dinner! May 24, 2018, Thursday 6-9 PM Dossin Great Lakes Historical Museum, Belle Isle
• Ferndale Public Library: Uprooted Music and Movement, 10:30 AM
• GO! Comedy: BERMAN RENTAL
• Oak Park Library: Family Game Night, 6:00 PM
• Hazel Park Memorial Weekend, Green Acres Park, 4-10 PM

Fri. May 25
• GO! Comedy: 8 PM: All-Star Showdown ($15); 10 PM: All-Star Showdown ($15)
• Ya’ssoo Festival, Memorial Day Weekend
• Detroit Fleat: Live Music, 8 PM
• Hazel Park Memorial Weekend, Green Acres Park, 10 AM-11 PM

Sat. May 26
• Ferndale Public Library: Sensory Saturdays, 2:00 PM
• Warner Memorial Church of God: May 26th Church Outdoor Beautification Day, 12-2 PM
• GO! Comedy: 8PM: All-Star Showdown ($18); 10PM: All-Star Showdown
• Ya’ssoo Festival, Memorial Day Weekend
• Detroit Fleat: Food Truck Rally, 12 PM – 6 PM
• Hazel Park Memorial Weekend, Green Acres Park, 10 AM -11 PM

Sun. May 27
• GO! Comedy: 7 PM: Sunday Buffet ($10): Hot Gold; ABC Family; 9 PM: Fresh Sauce
• Ya’ssoo Festival, Memorial Day Weekend
• Detroit Fleat: Food Truck Brunch, 11 AM
• Hazel Park Memorial Weekend, Green Acres Park, 10 AM-11 PM

Mon. May 28
• Ferndale Historical Memorial Day open house, 9 AM to Noon, 1651 Livernois, next to the fire station.
• Oak Park Library: Adult Computer Class, 9:00 AM
• Hazel Park Memorial Weekend, Green Acres Park, 9 AM – 9 PM

Tues. May 29
• Library – STEAM program for kids May 29 – 6:30 PM (Banana Keyboards) 248-546-2504 to register
• Ferndale Library: Tree Buds Infant Storytime, 2:00 PM
• Oak Park Library, It’s Story Time, Ages 2-6, 10:30 AM
• Oak Park Library: Adult Coloring Club, 6:00 PM
• Oak Park Library: Tournament Tuesdays, 6:00
• Detroit Fleat: Taco Tuesday with guest trucks
• 100th Annual Memorial Day Observance/Michigan Fallen Foot Float, Downtown Ferndale, 10 AM
• A Final Meeting with Lee Alan, Royal Oak Farmer’s Market

Weds. May 30
• Ferndale Library: Tree Sprouts Storytime, 10:30 AM
• GO! Comedy: 8PM: BITS ($10); 9PM: BITS ($10)
• Oak Park Public Safety Citizens Academy, 6:00 PM
• Detroit Fleat: Trivia Night
• Group Bike Ride, Downtown Ferndale Bikes

Thur. May 31
• Ferndale Public Library: Uprooted Music and Movement, 10:30 AM
• Axle Pride Kick-Off Event for Affirmations, 6 PM
• GO! Comedy: 8 PM: Mitch & Matt Present Something Rad; 9:30 PM: Dirty Ice Cubes
• Oak Park Library: Family Game Night, 6:00 PM