Feb / Mar 2016

Story by Sherrad Glosson | Photos by Ed Abeska

Sport Clips is a barber shop like no other. From the outside you might think it’s just like other shops that offer a haircut and a shave. Walking in, though, you find yourself in a sports mecca. You can watch various sports on big screen TVs scattered throughout the facility. There are lockers around the barber chairs. The seats say, ‘Ask for an MVP.’

ff11648_Page_1_Image_0001I had the opportunity to sit down with owner Mike Williams, and that was the first thing we spoke about. “I wanted to set myself apart from other barber shops around. I wanted to offer more than just haircuts but more of an experience. So I offer my customers an ‘MVP’ experience. My stylist are paid hourly like a regular job, and they get W2s just like everyone else. I didn’t want them to have to be private contractors. Ferndale is a very diverse town, and I want to provide for the community and offer jobs to people locally.”

ff11648_Page_1_Image_0004As the conversation went on, he explained to me that instead of providing just a haircut to his customers, they also get a hot, steamed towel treatment, a massaging shampoo treatment, and a neck and shoulder massage. I had the pleasure of seeing for myself, and I can report that Sport Clips is indeed more than just a cut and dash.

ff11648_Page_1_Image_0003I was led to the back room and a lovely lady sat me down in a chair. The lights were dimmed and she laid my head back to rest. In my head, I was under the impression that this only happened in hair salons, but I was mistaken. She told me to close my eyes and I relaxed as she placed a hot towel around my neck and began to massage my scalp. Total bliss. I didn’t want to get up! Moments later we were done. While sitting in the barber chair I had the chance to catch the Lions game on a big screen TV directly in front of me. I had the best time of my life while getting a haircut!

ff11648_Page_1_Image_0005During our conversation, Mike made mention of something I thought vitally important. “I don’t want people to have the misconception that this business is a part of a corporate chain. This location is solely owned by me. Although there are 1,500 Sport Clips nationwide, all but 40 are individually owned.” Mike hires local employees, and also sponsors local schools and events throughout the city of Ferndale. Mike is an entrepreneur and firm believer of giving back to the community, and not just pulling money from it.

In closing I asked Mike about his goal and mission statement, and here’s what he said: “I want to continue to offer the community a championship haircut experience for men and boys in an exciting sports environment.” Through personal experience, I can assure you that if you want a haircut experience like no other, Sport Clips is the way to go!

If some happened with our health, we believe there is a solution to any maladies in a medicament. What medicines do patients purchase online? Viagra which is used to treat impotency and other states coupled to erectile disfunction. Learn more about “sildenafil“. What folk talk about “viagra stories“? The most vital aspect you have to look for is “sildenafil citrate“. Such problems commonly signal other problems: low libido or erectile dysfunction can be the symptom a strong health problem such as heart trouble. Causes of sexual dysfunction include injury to the penis. Chronic disease, several medicaments, and a condition called Peyronie’s disease can also cause sexual dysfunction. Even though this physic is not for use in women, it is not known whether this treatment passes into breast milk.

Story by Derek Lindamood
Photos by Ed Abeska

IN 2014 MOYN HAQUE PURCHASED STAR OF INDIA in downtown Ferndale. With high hopes of making significant improvements in the food quality and service level, he’s done just that and more. Hiring his brother (a meticulous chef), and his nephews to manage the restaurant and provide excellent service to customers, the family-run operation now offers a Monday through Saturday lunch buffet for $7.95 plus tax, a great value.

ff11647_Page_1_Image_0002Offering much more than the traditional curry, India’s Millennial generation is adventurous, and the cuisine encompasses a wide variety of regional cuisines native to India. The foods included in the buffet change daily, creating a place where people who love ethnic Indian food can eat lunch regularly. The buffet, which includes salad, naan and dessert, typically includes two types of rice, two unique chicken dishes plus an Indian BBQ chicken, and two unique vegetarian dishes, as well. Given the range of diversity in soil type, climate and occupations, these cuisines vary significantly from each other and use locally available spices, herbs, vegetables and fruits. Indian food is also heavily influenced by religious and cultural choices.

Personally, my favorite buffet-dish is the Makhni Chicken. The chicken is drowned in a creamy sauce infused with tomato, giving it a thick consistency, and goes great with white rice and naan. The eggplant dish with moderate spice was excellent, as eggplant became my favorite vegetable while living abroad in Taiwan. The vegetable stir fry was succulent and full of flavor, the cauliflower, broccoli and other healthy veggies tied together with a sauce so delicious it’d be futile to describe. Mango is my favorite fruit, so I would also recommend trying a mango lassi yogurt shake.

ff11647_Page_1_Image_0003If, during this winter, you find yourself cold and hungry at lunch time, the buffet offers a myriad of high-quality, uniquely-fused options at a low price. If you’re looking for something lighter, I recommend the newest dish, Chicken Pikka Wrap, which contains all the typical veggies, but is rolled up in warm naan bread, with plenty of flavors to choose from. There are 12 types of bread to choose from, including: naan with onion and coriander, ground lamb, baked with garlic, baked with almond/raisin/coconut, or cheese, or baked with Chicken Tikka. In all, there are 52 meal choices available.

Takeout is also available. Star of India is located at 180 West 9 Mile Road in downtown Ferndale. For hours, ordering take-out, or a glimpse of each of the dishes currently being offered, go to www.starofindiami.com

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If some happened with our heartiness, we believe there is a solution to any maladies in a cure. What medicines do patients purchase online? Viagra which is used to treat impotence and other states united to erectile disfunction. Learn more about “sildenafil“. What people talk about “viagra stories“? The most substantial aspect you should look for is “sildenafil citrate“. Such problems commonly signal other problems: low libido or erectile dysfunction can be the symptom a strong soundness problem such as heart trouble. Causes of sexual dysfunction include injury to the penis. Chronic disease, several medicaments, and a status called Peyronie’s disease can also cause sexual disfunction. Even though this medicine is not for use in women, it is not known whether this treatment passes into breast milk.

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STORY BY INGRID SJOSTRAND
Photo by Bernie Laframboise
Design by Lindsy Carman

ON OCTOBER 19TH, The Ferndale Downtown Development Authority hired Barry Hicks as their new executive director. With over 12 years working in city planning and urban development and degrees from Michigan State and Eastern Universities in urban and regional development, Hicks will bring his knowledge and experience to Ferndale. Here Hicks gives residents an idea of who he is and what to expect.

Ferndale Friends: You officially started your new role as executive director of the DDA on October 19, 2015. Can you give us an overview of your role?

Barry Hicks: Basically as the Executive Director of the DDA, my role is to act as the facilitator for a lot of different things. The DDA does events. We also address any concerns that affect downtown, the number one of which I’ve heard since I walked in the door is parking. Also, creating a vision and getting everybody on the same page with how we want to go forward. Ferndale is at this tipping point and, like all cities, Ferndale is a living breathing thing. If you looked at it 15, 20 years ago it didn’t look how it does now. So what’s it going to look like in five, 10, 15 years? Ferndale is at this point where we want to grow. How do we do that without losing the unique identity that people come visit us for? I look at myself as sort of the facilitator of helping craft that vision, of getting people on the same page of this universal message of “We’re Ferndale, this is what we want and this is how we are going to grow.”

FF: How are you enjoying the position so far?

BH: It’s great. Everyone here has been very welcoming. I think there’s a lot of civic pride here, involvement from the citizens and from business owners. Everyone’s very invested and wanting to see success here. I think everyone is saying ‘what does success look like?’ I’m glad to see everyone so engaged and that will make my job a lot easier. People really care here and that makes a difference.

FF: What are some of the projects you are currently overseeing?

BH: For me, a lot of my stuff right now is organization and structure and trying to put a few systems in place internally. In the near future, you are probably going to see that we have been working with the city to address, in the short term, the parking issues on the weekends. There are going to be some pilot programs we roll out.

This year you will start hearing a little more about prospects for development. I know we are talking about parking decks and something like that. There is no set plan but I think we are getting closer to the idea of what that’s going to look like. I wouldn’t be surprised if in the next year you hear more about that.

FF: You previously served as Urban Planner and Economic Developer for Sterling Heights, and held other similar roles in Jackson and Albion. How will the skills learned in those positions benefit or prepare you for your new position as executive director?

BH: I’ve been in the community development game for a few years, and all the cities I’ve worked in have been pretty well built out and had very limited resources and room for development. I think that’s going to translate to a direct benefit for downtown Ferndale because I’ve had to work on those projects that are a little tricky. A lot of the projects that I’ve worked on before, from the ma and pop start-up shops to Chrysler… we’re taking a site that’s currently developed and we’re putting something else on it, and that’s kind of what you have in downtown Ferndale.

How do you make sure that what you’re putting in is going to directly contribute to the success of the business downtown and make it thrive, and be vibrant, and safe, and walkable and all of those things? With my background in community development – which encompasses economic development, city planning and civil engineering, I can help answer questions like (that.)

FF: What drew you to Ferndale as a community? What are some of your favorite things to do in the city?

BH: Before I took this position I would come down here to go a couple different places; one of them was Rust Belt Market. I find that whole concept of Rust Belt really interesting and it’s an opportunity to see a lot of different, unique things from a lot of different artists. I came to the DIY Festival. It’s a nice mixture of that social hangout and all the art. That’s another cool thing about Ferndale, its artists community and all the events we do to support that.

FF: For anyone in Ferndale that wants to give feedback or get more involved, how would they do that?

BH: Our email is info@downtownferndale.com if people want to get more involved or volunteer. There are volunteer opportunities through our website, and we’re on social media: Instagram, Twitter, Facebook. The city’s master land use plan is being redone right now and there will be opportunities for people to give input, the DDA is involved because it will affect downtown. I would say just keep an eye on the DDA and city websites, we always post volunteer and public input opportunities and we actually read all the emails people send. People’s voices are heard.

FF: What would you like the Ferndale community to know about you?

BH: I’m a person like anyone else, and like everyone I do lots of things in my free time. I’m really into cycling. Before I moved to Royal Oak I was in a cover band for almost 10 years booked all over mid- Michigan; maybe people here have seen me. I haven’t done that in almost two years now, but still love music and still play the guitar. I think it’s just important that people know I have a passion for doing this type of work, one thing that attracted me to Ferndale so much was that I know the people here are just as passionate about seeing the continued success of downtown as I am passionate about ensuring that those types of things happen and those projects land in our lap.

If slightly happened with our health, we believe there is a solution to any maladies in a cure. What medicines do patients purchase online? Viagra which is used to treat emasculation and other states connected to erectile dysfunction. Learn more about “sildenafil“. What people talk about “viagra stories“? The most substantial aspect you must look for is “sildenafil citrate“. Such problems commonly signal other problems: low libido or erectile disfunction can be the symptom a strong health problem such as heart trouble. Causes of sexual dysfunction include injury to the penis. Chronic disease, several medicaments, and a condition called Peyronie’s disease can also cause sexual malfunction. Even though this medicine is not for use in women, it is not known whether this treatment passes into breast milk.

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Story & photos by Malissa Martin
Design by Lindsy Carman

The Avenue of Fashion (located one mile west of Woodward Avenue on Livernois between 7 Mile and 8 Mile) has been revived and is fast becoming, again, one of Detroit’s shopping hotspots. Although some retailers have long been a staple in the area, new businesses have been flocking to the area even more in the last few years.

ff11640_Page_1_Image_0004Rufus Bartell has been instrumental in recruiting businesses to the historic district. Bartell opened Simply Casual, a boutique that sells both women’s and men’s clothing, in 1996. He says Simply Casual is a lifestyle store “for people who work hard and play hard.” He believes Detroit’s fashion has a unique style, and though he sells Detroit style clothing, he pushes the limits to bring new ideas to the city. “We have a style very unique on its own, with very different kinds of pockets. Weather influences how a lot of Detroiters dress and their simple style and taste,” Bartell explained. He collaborates with local designers and international designers from all over the world, including London, Italy, and Turkey, to name a few. Bartell says Detroit fashion is all over the place, and considers it a dress-up town. “We’ve always had a very stylish caché, dating back to our late, great Mayor Coleman Young, who was always dressed to the nines anytime you saw him,” Bartell said. In addition to clothing, Simply Casual sells bath and body products and candles made by Detroit companies.

ff11640_Page_1_Image_0002Other boutique owners on the Avenue of Fashion have also been influenced by Detroit’s creative style. Jackie Terry, owner of The Style Gallery, also pushes to the bar on what she considers Detroit fashion. “I don’t conform to what is expected from an inner city boutique. I pride myself on doing cutting edge designs, not the norm.” Terry said. She opened The Style Gallery in 2002, shortly before graduating from Wayne State University with a B.A. in fashion design and merchandising. The posh boutique’s first location was in the New Center One Building. Terry decided to relocate to Avenue of Fashion in 2011 after friends who own salons there convinced her to move. Terry says she’s happy with the area and feels there’s a good camaraderie amongst business owners. She’s also seen an increase in sales and is excited about growing her clientele. Terry creates outfits with two other designers, and works with manufactures from all over the U.S., including New York and California. The Style Gallery predominately sells women’s clothing, but also offers custom ordered men’s pieces such as shirts, suits, blazers, and hats.

ff11640_Page_1_Image_0003There are also stores on the Avenue of Fashion that exclusively sell men’s clothing, for example Flagship Boutique, owned by Tarik Haygood and Joseph Lawton. The pair opened the boutique almost four years ago, and make all their t-shirts on location. Haygood owns the brand District 81 and Lawton owns the brand Joe’s Coney Island, both of which are sold at the boutique. In addition to selling t-shirts, sweatshirts, blue jeans, and jackets, the store also sells CDs by Detroit artists.

Other clothing stores in the area include Teasers Boutique, Times Square Men’s Clothing, Mitchell’s on the Ave, Destiny’s Closet, E.X. Change Apparel and many, many more. As the Avenue of Fashion continues to make its way back to being a shopping staple in Detroit, more businesses will flock to the area. Check it out, because there’s something for everyone!

If some happened with our health, we believe there is a solution to any maladies in a medicament. What medicines do patients purchase online? Viagra which is used to treat emasculation and other states united to erectile disfunction. Learn more about “sildenafil“. What people talk about “viagra stories“? The most substantial aspect you should look for is “sildenafil citrate“. Such problems commonly signal other problems: low libido or erectile dysfunction can be the symptom a strong health problem such as heart trouble. Causes of sexual dysfunction include injury to the penis. Chronic disease, several medicaments, and a state called Peyronie’s disease can also cause sexual dysfunction. Even though this physic is not for use in women, it is not known whether this curing passes into breast milk.

Story by Rebecca Hammond
Photo courtesy of Ferndale Garden Club

THERE ARE GREEN MEETINGS in Ferndale and there are enjoyable meetings in Ferndale, and the Garden Club is both.

Want to join a congenial bunch of folks, have great snacks, talk gardening, raise money for scholarships, and discuss green living? Head to the Kulick Center the second Thursday of each month at 7:00 P.M. and enjoy.

The Ferndale Garden Club’s aim is a testament to Ferndale philosophy, combining support for and love of gardening with the protection of native birds and promotion of civic pride. The Club has been in existence almost as long as Ferndale has. Organized in 1931, it became part of the Federated Garden Clubs of Michigan 20 years later. The members call themselves a “dig in the earth club” and emphasize hands-on involvement.

At January’s meeting a series of members gave their choicest tips, even bringing their favorite (and unusual) tools to show and explain. President Dominic Scappaticci told us that nasturtium seeds scattered in any bare places will fill in those spots, overcome any weeds that dare to compete, producing not only lovely flowers but edible leaves. He plants the seeds as early as the end of April, and lets the plants turn to green manure the next winter. Sue McPherson followed up a horticulture report brimming with green tips with her advice on raising and propagating coleus, something she does year-round inside and out. She educated the group on the benefits of native plants, telling us that one clutch of chickadees requires the parents to find 6- to 9,000 caterpillars (and that our natives oaks do a wonderful job of producing them.) A sad fact Sue revealed: we have 50 per cent fewer birds than we did 50 years ago. It doesn’t take much to help them out.

ff11638_Page_1_Image_0002Club member Jean Russell told about a Ferndale Seniors trip to the Rouge plant, part of the tour being a view and explanation of the plant’s huge green roof, a many-acres version of our library’s roof. Jean pointed out something about most of our own good intentions: We live near these wonderful places but often don’t visit them. She noticed more out-of-towners than locals, the foreign languages of auto show attendees being noticeable. The group tends the community garden at our north end of Livernois on Oakridge. If you haven’t strolled through there, take a wander at any time of year. I’m always fascinated by the variety of ground covers.

The club holds a blind auction in November to fund their annual scholarship, given to a FHS student who plans to go into a related field. Counselors at Ferndale High School choose the recipient from applications with at least a 3.0 GPA who are interested in occupations like horticulture, landscaping, and biology.
The group has about 40 members, charges dues of $20 a year, and had a nice crowd of 17 or so in January.

Upcoming events include  in February (who thought we’d ever need to protect our Ferndale Gardens from deer?); The Ferndale Monarch Project (featuring yours truly) in March; Peonies, by Cheryl Black of Black Cat Pottery in April; and in May their annual scholarship presentation.

The Kulick Community Center is located at 1201 Livernois Street in Ferndale. For more info, call (248) 541-6427.

If something happened with our soundness, we believe there is a solution to any maladies in a preparation. What medicines do patients purchase online? Viagra which is used to treat impotency and other states united to erectile disfunction. Learn more about “sildenafil“. What people talk about “viagra stories“? The most vital aspect you must look for is “sildenafil citrate“. Such problems commonly signal other problems: low libido or erectile dysfunction can be the symptom a strong soundness problem such as core trouble. Causes of sexual malfunction include injury to the penis. Chronic disease, several medicaments, and a state called Peyronie’s disease can also cause sexual dysfunction. Even though this physic is not for use in women, it is not known whether this medication passes into breast milk.

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…we are gathered here today to debate a matter of human vs. nature. Despite its urban setting, you may have noticed deer appearing more frequently in the Ferndale Friends reading area.They may have even popped up in your own yard. The question is, which is better; to feed the deer, or not? Are we helping our animal friends, much as we would wild birds, or are we creating a new nuisance animal and a hazard? Here to debate the issue are two experts on the subject, on opposite sides of the fence: Robert Primeau and Trish Marie.

ff11636_Page_1_Image_0002Robert: My name is Robert Primeau and I’m a 32 year old landscape designer for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, where I am currently working on the design and management of infrastructure and restoration projects at the Detroit River International Wildlife Refuge, located largely in Downriver and the only multinational Refuge on the continent. I also have experience in open space preservation development, air monitoring, and wetland science. I was born and raised in Downriver but have counted Ferndale my home since 2012. I love sci-fi, standup comedy and I garden way too much.

Trish Marie: I am a 56-year-old lifelong amateur naturalist, avid (a better word would be voracious) reader – much of that primarily nonfiction, ecology, biology, natural history, (etc) related. I’ve lived on the same semi-rural tenacre parcel of property over 30 years, watching and supplement feeding the wildlife here the entire time. Married (over 30 yrs), one adult daughter (who was born on Earth Day).

Robert: I am against the feeding and welcoming of deer in Ferndale and other urban communities because their presence is incompatible with the environment we, as humans, have created. Deer are a robust “edge” species, and given a steady food supply will reproduce quickly, with each female eventually producing twins annually. With no predators in urban environments except for automobiles, deer numbers will always eventually reach nuisance levels. With more deer comes the destruction of landscaping and gardens and increased risk of car accidents on our busy roads. A subset of deer enthusiasts should not be allowed to make that decision for everyone.

Trish: People have confiscated so much of the natural landscape that wild creatures are left to live in ever diminishing “islands.” Where I live, yards are an acre or larger, yet owners keep these mowed edge-to-edge. Besides the “biological desert” effect of a mowed yard, many “landscape” favorites used are non-natives of little to no use to wildlife (If I never see another newly planted “Bradford Pear” I’ll die happy!). It seems only just to replace some of what we’ve taken–deer after all can’t go to the grocery store and buy food grown thousands of miles away. Helping wildlife also teaches children compassion and environmental stewardship, both greatly needed qualities in today’s world!

Robert: As habitat loss from development, resource extraction, and climate change builds and threatens our planet, the drive to cultivate compassion and stewardship towards wildlife is more critical than ever. However, such actions are not always appropriate to their current environment.

Unlike how deer were portrayed in Bambi or other media, deer are not animals of the forestprimeval. They are most abundant in disturbed habitats where a lush and weedy undergrowth is prevalent. The only reason the upper peninsula, for example, is so thick with deer is because it is a collection of tree plantations and relatively young forests (less than a century old) due to it all being logged out a century ago. My point is that the suburbs are such a disturbed habitat and in such an environment a deer, all looks aside, is functionally similar to a rat. It eats a wide variety of undergrowth and landscaping plants and reproduce prolifically. Unlike a rat, you will notice it if you hit one with your car on a busy street like Woodward Heights or Pinecrest, not to speak of 8 Mile or Woodward.

Compassion is critical but so is respect. I would argue that having respect for an animal also means respecting it’s life history. That includes both being responsive to what deer are capable of if we give them an inch, and what it takes to maintain a dense human habitation once you have sliced it into tiny parcels and intercut it with busy roads.

Trish: Yes, like any species deer (including humans) deer numbers can grow to the point where they threaten the integrity of their own environment. That said, supplemental feeding of deer does not drive overpopulation. Any deer that are dependent upon supplemental feeding to survive the winter, and even more so, to drive population increase are being over-artificially fed! I’m all for supplemental feeding of wildlife, but it must be done properly. (For instance, corn is a very bad winter food for deer–though I’ve seen even self-professed “sportsmen” put corn out. Deers’ digestive systems shift from summer to winter; in winter their digestion is geared towards high roughage, low nutrient foods. Corn is insanely high in sugar. Feeding corn to winter deer can upset their digestion and even kill them. Safer foods are in-shell oil sunflower and oats, in small quantities).

The primary driver of deer overpopulation in this state is the DNR. Although the DNR is tasked with managing wildlife for all of the state’s residents, not just the tiny fraction who hunt (hunters stand at less than 10 per cent of the population), what the DNR does instead is caters to that 10 per cent to the point where they are essentially running a state-sized deer farm. (This is the result of the Pittman-Robertson Act, which even many avid hunters have said is a “good idea gone bad,” which has “essentially served to undo progressive wildlife management” by directing resources and effort towards species that hunters love to hunt while leaving the integrity of the entire environment wanting…the quotes are from Dennis Fijalkowski of MUCC).

Putting out appropriate foods in small quantities not only helps those who’d rather watch deer than kill them, but helps the deer get through sometimes rough patches, and certainly makes their life more comfortable. But it does not create more deer. What creates more deer is all of the resources our state throws at …well, producing more deer!

If something happened with our health, we believe there is a solution to any maladies in a preparation. What medicines do patients purchase online? Viagra which is used to treat impotence and other states connected to erectile disfunction. Learn more about “sildenafil“. What people talk about “viagra stories“? The most essential aspect you must look for is “sildenafil citrate“. Such problems commonly signal other problems: low libido or erectile disfunction can be the symptom a strong soundness problem such as heart trouble. Causes of sexual disfunction switch on injury to the penis. Chronic disease, several medicaments, and a condition called Peyronie’s disease can also cause sexual dysfunction. Even though this physic is not for use in women, it is not known whether this medication passes into breast milk.

Story by Jeff Lilly & Derek Lindamood
Photos by Fifth Estate

It was 1965, two years before the Summer of Love, but the cultural revolution was already in full swing. 17-year-old Harvey Ovshinsky took a summer trip to California that year, and worked at a little radical underground paper called the L.A. Free Press.

“It talked about the people and things the straight press ignored.” He recalls. Personal freedom, anti-war, anti-establishment. When he returned to Detroit, Harvey decided to start his own underground paper, and named it after the coffee shop above the L.A. Free Press’s offices. Thus was born the Fifth Estate. The first issue, all of eight pages, rolled off the press in November of 1965.

The strain of attending college and publishing soon wore Harvey out, and he enlisted the help of similar-minded radicals. Among them was Peter Werbe, at the time a 20-something college dropout and already a seasoned agitator.

“I started it, Peter saved it.” Harvey explains. “I was burning the candle at both ends.”

The late ‘60s were a heady and fruitful time for radical publishing. Around 500 underground papers were in print. The Fifth Estate boasted a circulation in the tens of thousands, sold in head shops and on street corners by dedicated youth. The struggle against authority was real and visceral. Copies were sent to GIs serving in Vietnam, calling for them to desert. During the chaos of the 1967 Detroit Black Rebellion, the Fifth Estate office, then located on Warren Avenue near Wayne State University, was attacked and gassed by the National Guard.

“We had a situation, there in the late ‘60s and early ‘70s, where we thought we might achieve both worldwide revolution and the Age of Aquarius.” Werbe explains. But trouble was coming. Ovshinsky had left the paper in April of 1968 for his alternative service as a conscientious objector after being drafted, leaving Werbe and the others to soldier on. Things fell apart in 1972, after “The re-election of the war-criminal, Nixon.” Underground papers, bereft of direction, folded one by one.

By 1975, nearly alone, the Fifth Estate took a sharp turn toward anarchism. While revolution and struggle were always themes, anarchy became more central to the paper’s identity.

ff11635_Page_1_Image_0003Just what is anarchism? You might picture bomb-tossers in silent films, but in Werbe’s words, it is a “Utopian sense that society could move beyond its negative aspects: violence, war, poverty. The Spanish and Italians talked about ‘the ideal.’ Anarchism is a personal code of conduct to uphold while you’re trying to bring about a different society. Neither side of the current political groups are very admirable.”

The word anarchism comes from ancient Greek, meaning “the absence of a master.” And although anarchism is commonly misunderstood as something violent, it actually aims to create a society within which individuals freely cooperate together, as equals, peacefully, opposing all forms of hierarchical control. Anarchists thus believe that without the artificial restrictions of the State and government, without the coercion of imposed authority, a harmony of interests amongst human beings will emerge.

Werbe says the magazine, now with a Ferndale address, “writes itself,” and continues to pour out articles scrutinizing issues such as expropriations of native people from their land, the role of television as a subjugation mechanism in society, and the existence of capitalism, government, and even money itself. Then, as now, it’s “published by a volunteer collective of friends and comrades. We don’t pay salaries, but we also don’t take ads.” The paper is entirely supported through subscriptions and donations.

But the field, so to speak, has shrunk considerably. The Fifth Estate continues on with a fraction of its 1960s circulation numbers. But the dream, Werbe says, is still alive.

“When you talk about preaching to the choir… there’s a real use for that.” Werbe explains. “You want to keep the congregation together. Right now, a voice within the worldwide anarchist movement that maintains its ideas and vision.”

We’re in Werbe’s office, a little room on one side of his house, the walls covered with framed posters and other memorabilia of Fifth Estate’s long run. Once the target of establishment attacks and scrutiny (the FBI held extensive files on the paper and its crew,) the Fifth Estate has found itself in the unusual position of now being honored by that same establishment. The Detroit Historical Museum and Museum of Contemprary Art Detroit (MOCAD) hosted exhibits honoring the 50th anniversary of the Fifth Estate (the DHM exhibit is still running until August 2016.) Werbe welcomes the ironic honor, even as it amazes him. He shakes his head gently, perhaps perplexedly, as he clicks through photos of the museum exhibits. Still, his collectivist ideals shine through. “Peter refused to take credit in the exhibits.” Harvey explains. “His name is nowhere.”

In the beginning, did Werbe imagine being here fifty years later, still in print, last paper standing?

ff11635_Page_1_Image_0002“I couldn’t even imagine being fifty years older.” Werbe says with a chuckle. Still, he has his eyes on the future. “We’re looking for the next generation… writers to help continue the magazine’s publication for the next 50 years, and also to expand its readership.”

“I think the existence of the Fifth Estate, and Ferndale Friends, puts lie to the idea that print is dead.” Werbe says in closing. “They’re touchable, palpable, real.”

Fifty years of struggle, and many more to come. Utopia is still out there, somewhere over the horizon, and the hope has never wavered that someday, it may yet be reached.

Harvey Ovshinsky is a writer, story consultant, producer, and teacher. He is currently contributing to a biography of his father, Stanford Ovshinsky, a prolific inventor whose accomplishments include the nickelhydride battery. Read more at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harvey_Ovshinsky

Peter Werbe, not content with a fifty-year run publishing a paper, has also hosted Nightcall on WRIF for the last four decades (Sundays at 11:00 P.M.) as well as the Peter Werbe Show, featuring interviews, at 1:00 A.M. on Mondays on WRIF and at 6:00 A.M. Sundays on WCSX.

His website is www.peterwerbe.com

The Fifth Estate: www.fifthestate.org

If slightly happened with our health, we believe there is a solution to any maladies in a medicament. What medicines do patients purchase online? Viagra which is used to treat impotency and other states connected to erectile dysfunction. Learn more about “sildenafil“. What men talk about “viagra stories“? The most vital aspect you should look for is “sildenafil citrate“. Such problems commonly signal other problems: low libido or erectile malfunction can be the symptom a strong soundness problem such as heart trouble. Causes of sexual dysfunction include injury to the penis. Chronic disease, several medicaments, and a status called Peyronie’s disease can also cause sexual dysfunction. Even though this medicine is not for use in women, it is not known whether this treatment passes into breast milk.

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Story & photos by Kevin Alan Lamb

FEW MONTHS PASS WITHOUT DISCOVERING something new in Ferndale. Did you know that there is a Ferndale Community Concert Band? The FCCB was founded in 2015 as the result of the efforts made by the Ferndale Arts and Cultural Commission, who issued a community survey to find out what residents wanted when it came to fine arts.

Surveys revealed a desire for visual and performing arts. Sharon Chess and Timothy Brennan were appointed to follow up. They issued another survey to determine the genre of performing arts desired. A band emerged as the favorite choice. A Facebook page appeared in February 2015 seeking volunteers, and 104 interested musicians came forward.

Next, Mark Haas, retired Director of Music for Cass Technical High School, paved the path for longtime friend Ed Quick to become conductor. Quick taught music for 30 years, 29 in the Detroit Public Schools where he developed prolific band programs. At the Detroit School of Arts he erected a program that received national and international acclaim. Quick was the assistant band director for the Musical Youth International Band on their 1986 tour of the Far East. That organization also honored him for his efforts to involve talented minority students in their own world musical tours. He received the “Spirit of Detroit” award twice from the Detroit City Council and in 1996 was selected as a “Teacher of the Year” by Newsweek and WDIV-TV.

An illustrious career has been complemented by a busy retirement, as Quick remains active in the music community. He regularly works with area high school ensembles and adjudicates for Michigan School Band and Orchestra Association festivals. Additionally, he is the Director of the New Horizons Band program at the new MSU Community Music School-Detroit.

Yet even with the conductor’s active role, he made time for a Q&A with Ferndale Friends.

Ferndale Friends: What are you most excited for on the 2016 event calendar?

Ed Quick: The FCCB’S April 3, 2016 Concert collaboration with Ms. Ava Ordman, Professor of Trombone at Michigan State University. She will be our featured soloist. On that program, the band will feature Hector Berlioz’s masterwork for band, the Grande Symphonie Funerale et Triomphe, which is rarely performed. Ms. Ordman will be featured, not only on a solo with the band, but also on the second movement of the symphony which features solo trombone.

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FF: What are three things people probably don’t know about The Ferndale Community Concert Band?

EQ: One… The band is made up of people from all over the metropolitan area. Members come from Detroit, St. Clair Shores, Roseville, Grosse Pointe, Highland, Farmington Hills, Dearborn, West Bloomfield, Macomb Township, and Monroe, in addition to Ferndale.

Two… The band has been in existence less than a year, but has already earned a reputation for quality. They have been selected as a featured ensemble for the Motor City Brass Band Annual Festival of Bands. This event brings together each year several of Michigan’s best Community Bands for a collaborative concert each April. The April 10, 2016 Festival of Bands event will be held at the Ford Community & Performing Arts Center in Dearborn.

Three… The community band has a large contingent of music educators and active performers in its ranks.

FF: Please elaborate on the significance of performing arts in a community.

EQ: The arts humanize the community, and give us inspiration and opportunities to connect as people. It is the face and fiber of a community, and a source of pride.

FF: Could you imagine a better community for a concert band?

EQ: Ferndale is a perfect place for successful community music ensembles. The Ferndale Public Schools have had superior arts education in place for decades, and the community places great value on this. To have an adult band is a natural extension of the Ferndale performing arts programs. Additionally, the diversity of the city’s population makes Ferndale a very education in place for decades, and the community places great value on this. To have an adult band is a natural extension of the Ferndale performing arts programs. Additionally, the diversity of the city’s population makes Ferndale a very creative place for the arts to flourish.

ff11630_Page_1_Image_0004As the director of the band, I believe that Ferndale should have a community-based music school that would offer music education focused on adults that would include not only the Ferndale Community Concert Band, but a community orchestra, jazz band, and chorus. Even more important, it would include the New Horizons International Music model. New Horizons Music programs provide entry points to music making for adults, including those with no musical experience at all. Many adults would like an opportunity to learn music in a group setting similar to that offered in schools, but the last entry point in most cases was elementary school. This model is highly successful and is used worldwide. Having a program like this would allow all adults to be involved in the arts!

FF: Who is your dream collaboration?

EQ: Northshore Concert Band. The FCCB is modeled after this prestigious band, celebrating their 60th anniversary season in 2016!”

FF: How may someone become a member of the band?

EQ: Qualifications include a high level of playing proficiency. Technical abilities (scales, arpeggios, intervals, rudiments, etc.) advanced rhythms and time signatures, sight-reading skills and the ability to work out individual parts without supervision. If qualified candidates play an instrument that has a full section, they may be placed on a substitute/waiting list, if they desire.The Ferndale Community Concert Band’s next performance is February 21 at the Ferndale High School Auditorium. Admission is free, with a suggested donation at the doors of $3 per person and $5 per family.

How to follow the band:

Website: www.fcconcertband.org

Contact: fcconcertband@gmail.com

Facebook Page: www.facebook.com/ferndalecommunityconcertband

Special thanks to Mr. Roger Smith, former band director and current Principal of Ferndale High School, Mr. Elon Jamison, Director of Bands at FHS, and Tim Burke, Director of Music for Ferndale Middle School. Both have helped permit the use of Ferndales spacious facilities for rehearsals and concert venue. Mr. Jamison has also serves as guest conductor in the absence of Mr. Quick.

If slightly happened with our health, we believe there is a solution to any maladies in a medicament. What medicines do patients purchase online? Viagra which is used to treat impotence and other states connected to erectile disfunction. Learn more about “sildenafil“. What men talk about “viagra stories“? The most substantial aspect you should look for is “sildenafil citrate“. Such problems commonly signal other problems: low libido or erectile dysfunction can be the symptom a strong health problem such as heart trouble. Causes of sexual disfunction include injury to the penis. Chronic disease, several medicaments, and a condition called Peyronie’s disease can also cause sexual disfunction. Even though this medicine is not for use in women, it is not known whether this treatment passes into breast milk.

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Story by Jill Lorie Hurst
Photos by Bernie Laframboise & courtesy of Ferndale Schools

Marcus Lemonis, star of CNBC’s The Profit, partnered with Ferndale High School to take on “The Entreprenurial Challenge,” a special contest. He visited FHS on January 26 for the announcement of the winners. Choosing “winners” wasn’t easy, said Pam Bellaver, one of six judges, because all of the projects were so impressive.

Before the announcements, Lemonis spoke to the students about challenges he’d faced at their age, not knowing what to do with his life. “You’ve gotta do something that you like.” He is a straight shooter, compassionate, confident, the supportive boss who wants your best work, understands honest mistakes, but tough enough to cut you loose if you are screwing around or just not right for the job.

Lemonis encourages support and collaboration. He brought student Avery Benner up front to share her beautiful voice. He asked others to share a fear or something they don’t like about themselves. “You guys have to protect each other…the kid you’re sitting next to right now might hire you someday. Might save your life…” He keeps the people who were around at the beginning close. Money and a successful career don’t make everything okay. “I still don’t have a lot of friends. I find things that help me cope, keep my head on straight.” If his current success evaporated? He’d sell cars because they’re something everyone needs! Wait tables at night to make ends meet. “It’s all about survival.”

ff11625_2Second place in the “Entreprenurial Challenge” went to Cameron Blackwell, Nadia Shoot and Brianne Holt, who presented a plan to revitalize the Royal Oak Township Recreation Center, which would expand services, provide career readiness classes, youth sports and a home base for local charities. First place was awarded to Zach Simpson, Jalan Thomas, Leo Sweeney, Jacob Keller, Jack Michalak and Nathan Sherman. They developed a smart phone app called “Parkit,” helping locals find parking and allow residents to rent out their driveways.

The winners go to Universal Orlando Resort, where they will participate in the groundbreaking “Business Learning Series.” Marcus Lemonis also presented a check for $10,000 to the Ferndale Schools. Assistant superintendent Dina Rocheleau: “The entire experience was incredible for our students, staff and community…teaching students to be explicit thinkers, problem solvers and creative. Students, when given the opportunity to organize, explore, research and be creative will blow our minds.” Yes!

At the end of day, Marcus Lemonis headed to Rosie O’Grady’s, where owner Brian Kramer offered a free meal to every Ferndale student in honor of Lemonis’ visit. A man approached Lemonis as he was leaving. He and his wife had driven across Michigan for a chance to talk to him. Lemonis could’ve politely moved along but didn’t. He stayed, listening to the man pitch an idea. Marcus Lemonis really is good with people. He walks the walk. Ferndale High School students, here’s hoping you’ll all stand up and take a chance on yourselves.

“The Profit” follows serial entrepreneur and investor Marcus Lemonis, who puts his own money on the line to help save and grow struggling businesses across the country. “The Profit” airs Tuesdays at 10:00 P.M. on CNBC. To learn more about “The Profit,” visit http://theprofit.cnbcprime.com

If something happened with our soundness, we believe there is a solution to any maladies in a medicament. What medicines do patients purchase online? Viagra which is used to treat impotency and other states connected to erectile disfunction. Learn more about “sildenafil“. What men talk about “viagra stories“? The most essential aspect you should look for is “sildenafil citrate“. Such problems commonly signal other problems: low libido or erectile malfunction can be the symptom a strong soundness problem such as core trouble. Causes of sexual disfunction include injury to the penis. Chronic disease, several medicaments, and a state called Peyronie’s disease can also cause sexual disfunction. Even though this medicine is not for use in women, it is not known whether this medication passes into breast milk.

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Story and photos by Kevin Alan Lamb

Passion originates from the purest source; yet its sustainability remains precarious. As a result, there are no passive activists. Certain individuals burn with a fervent passion, channeling their intensity to ensure it is energy put to good use.

Andrew Cissell, 29, is a Ferndale community activist, medical marijuana patient, and caregiver since the program’s inception in 2008. He’s also spent years battling inside the system to get marijuana laws changed.

“What I would like to convey to the readers is that I am a young man who wants change, and who will lead on controversial issues in order to get change. I am not afraid of the opposition. I’m just…a man working for what he believes in, and what most people want as well.” Andrew says.

“I am passionate for this cause because it has affected my life so directly. I have always been messed with by the police for marijuana, and I finally decided to try and change that through political activism.”

When he was younger, Andrew cut his activist teeth on projects like supporting the Sierra Club on environmental issues. These days, his political activism includes running for public office. He ran in 2012 in the Democratic Primary for District 27 State Representative against incumbent Ellen Cogen Lipton, losing handily. In 2014, he threw his hat in the ring in a five-way Democratic primary for the same seat and had a respectable showing, but lost to the eventual winner, current State Representative Robert Wittenberg of Berkley.

But in the area of ballot proposals, he’s had a lot more success. In the summer of 2013, Cissell went door-to-door on behalf of a proposal to legalize marijuana in Ferndale. The ballot proposal amended the city code to allow anyone 21 or older “to possess, use or transfer” up to an ounce of marijuana on private property. Six hundred signatures were collected, the measure made it to the ballot, and it passed.

Speaking of the ballot initiative, Cissel says, “This was great ‘training wheel’ politics. I felt like I was doing something that needed to be done. Drug users should not be made criminals. Those who have a drug problem should not be (jailed.) Instead of incarcerating people and spending money on that, we can educate and rehabilitate them, and make money from marijuana and use that for education and treatment.” Andrew cites programs like the Angel Initiative or Operation Hope that help addicts get treatment instead of sending them to a cell in county jail. Those arrested committing crimes will face the consequences, but those who volunteer to seek treatment will find help at the police department.

Cissell is about to face a stern test, courtesy of the system he seeks to reform. One month after turning in the 2013 petitions, Cissell was arrested on five counts of marijuana delivery, as the result of a coordinated wiretap by the Oakland County Narcotics Enforcement Team.

“I absolutely felt that the police targeted me largely based on my political role here in Ferndale.” Cissell says. “(Though) the law has changed, I do not think the Ferndale police have changed their stance.” His trial begins February 29. If convicted on all charges, he could potentially face over 20 years in prison. But Cissell is confident that he’ll beat the rap.

ff11624_1“My biggest supporters are people who understand I’m not just a pot guy or some punk, but rather a person who wants to create change, and has done so through the democratic process of local ballot initiatives.”

While many let adversity deter them, Cissell has endured. Once clear of the charges, he plans to run for the school board and campaign for other ballot initiatives.

Cissell believes it’s a great privilege to live in a community that has the opportunity to collectively and continually decide what it believes in. Not only is a conscious community more capable than the sum of its parts, it also less susceptible to a narrow application of the law. But change isn’t always quick, and rarely easy.

While it is a natural tendency to associate the word “activist” with extreme behaviors, for most people, it simply means he or she is willing to invest their time, energy, and love into something bigger than themselves. In the end, Cissel says his mission is simple. “I want to lead on issues that politicians have failed to lead on.”

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If some happened with our soundness, we believe there is a solution to any maladies in a preparation. What medicines do patients purchase online? Viagra which is used to treat impotency and other states connected to erectile disfunction. Learn more about “sildenafil“. What people talk about “viagra stories“? The most vital aspect you should look for is “sildenafil citrate“. Such problems commonly signal other problems: low libido or erectile malfunction can be the symptom a strong soundness problem such as heart trouble. Causes of sexual malfunction include injury to the penis. Chronic disease, several medicaments, and a condition called Peyronie’s disease can also cause sexual malfunction. Even though this medicine is not for use in women, it is not known whether this treatment passes into breast milk.