Editions

Sun. July 1
• Detroit Fleat: Food Truck Brunch, 11:00 AM
• Hazel Park Memorial Museum open Noon-4 PM

Mon. July 2
• Oak Park Library: Adult Computer Class, 9:00 AM
• Loaded Die, Rust Belt Market: Board Game Night

Tues. July 3
• Ferndale Library: Tree Buds Infant Storytime, 2:00 PM
• Oak Park Library, It’s Story Time, age 2-6, 10:30 AM
• Oak Park Library: Adult Coloring Club, 6:00 PM
• Oak Park Library: Tournament Tuesdays, 6:00 PM
• Detroit Fleat: Taco Tuesday with Guest trucks
• Citizens For A Fair Ferndale, Ferndale Library, 6:30 PM

Weds. July 4
• Ferndale Library: Tree Sprouts Storytime, 10:30 AM
• Oak Park Library: Book Club, 6:00 PM
• Detroit Fleat: Trivia Night

Thur. July 5
• Ferndale Public Library: Uprooted Music and Movement, 10:30 AM
• GO! Comedy: 8 PM Dirty Ice Cubes
• Oak Park Library: Family Game Night, 6:00 PM

Fri. July 6
• Michigan Rib Fest: Downtown Royal Oak
• GO! Comedy: Date Night
• Detroit Fleat: Live Music, 8 PM

Sat. July 7
• Ferndale Public Library: Sensory Saturdays, 2:00 PM
• Michigan Rib Fest: Downtown Royal Oak
• Detroit Fleat: Food Truck Face-off, 12 PM – 6 PM

Sun. July 8
• Art in the Park, a free children’s art experience presented by the Hazel Park Arts Council at the Hazel Park Growers and Makers Market, Green Acres Park
• Michigan Rib Fest: Downtown Royal Oak
• Detroit Fleat: Food Truck Brunch, 11:00 AM
• Yoga In The Park, 11AM-Noon, Geary Park

Mon. July 9
• Oak Park Library: Adult Computer Class, 9:00 AM
• City Hall: Last day to register for the August Primary
• Loaded Die, Rust Belt Market: Board Game Night

Tues. July 10
• Ferndale Public Library, 6:30 PM: Puppet Show with Alex Thomas and Friends
• Ferndale Library: Tree Buds Infant Storytime, 2:00 PM
• Oak Park Library, It’s Story Time, Ages 2-6, 10:30 AM
• Oak Park Library: Adult Coloring Club, 6:00 PM
• Oak Park Library: Tournament Tuesdays, 6:00
• Detroit Fleat: Taco Tuesday with Guest trucks

Weds. July 11
• Ferndale Library: Tree Sprouts Storytime, 10:30 AM
• GO! Comedy: 8 PM: BITS ($10)
• Detroit Fleat: Trivia Night

Thurs. July 12
• Library ADULTING 101 Series (Etiquette) – 6:30 PM
• Ferndale Public Library: Uprooted Music and Movement, 10:30 AM, Martin Road Park
• GO! Comedy: Lets Just Say
• Oak Park Library: Family Game Night, 6:00 PM

Fri. July 13
• GO! Comedy: Character Fondue
• Berkley Art & About
• Detroit Fleat: Live Music, 8 PM
• Pig & Whiskey: Downtown Ferndale

Sat. July 14
• Ferndale Public Library: Sensory Saturdays, 2:00 P.M.
• 2nd Annual Berkley Street Art Fest, 11-5, Downtown Berkley, berkleystreetartfest.com
• Summer Beer Fest, downtown Royal Oak
• Detroit Fleat: Slooshie Bar, 6 different boozy slushees at the patio bar 12-6 PM
• Pig & Whiskey: Downtown Ferndale

Sun. July 15
• Detroit Fleat: Food Truck Brunch, 11:00 AM
• Yoga In The Park, 11AM-Noon, Geary Park
• Pig & Whiskey: Downtown Ferndale

Mon. July 16
• Ferndale Public Library 2 PM: Mad Science Detroit: Marvels in Motion
• Oak Park Library: Adult Computer Class, 9:00 AM
• Loaded Die, Rust Belt Market: Board Game Night

Tues. July 17
• Ferndale Library Summer Concert Series – 6:30 PM (Nadir Omowale)
• Ferndale Library: Tree Buds Infant Storytime, 2:00 PM
• Oak Park Library, It’s Story Time, Ages 2-6, 10:30 AM
• Oak Park Library: Adult Coloring Club, 6:00 PM
• Oak Park Library: Tournament Tuesdays, 6:00 PM
• Detroit Fleat: Taco Tuesday with guest trucks

Weds. July 18
• Ferndale Library: Tree Sprouts Storytime, 10:30 AM
• GO! Comedy: 8PM: BITS ($10); 9pm: Female Hysteria
• Detroit Fleat: Trivia Night

Thur. July 19
• Ferndale Public Library: Uprooted Music and Movement, 10:30 AM
• Ferndale Beautification Commission Monthly Meeting, 6:30 PM at the Ferndale Public Library
• GO! Comedy: 9 PM: Hot Takes ($10)
• Berkley Ladies Night Out
• Oak Park Library: Family Game Night, 6:00 PM
• Park It Night: 6 PM Harding Park
• Get Reel Movies On Vester, starts at dusk
• Hazel Park Memorial Museum open 6-8 PM

Fri. July 20
• GO! Comedy: Date Night
• Detroit Fleat: Live Music, 8 PM

Sat. July 21
• Ferndale Public Library: Sensory Saturdays, 2:00 PM

Sun. July 22
• Art in the Park, a free children’s art experience presented by the Hazel Park Arts Council at the Hazel Park Growers and Makers Market, Green Acres Park
• Detroit Fleat: Food Truck Brunch 11:00 AM
• Detroit Fleat: Disco Brunch with DJ Joe V., 11 AM-4 PM, Brunch options from all food trucks.
• Yoga In The Park, 11AM-Noon, Geary Park

Mon. July 23
• Oak Park Library: Adult Computer Class, 9:00 AM
• Loaded Die, Rust Belt Market: Board Game Night

Tues. July 24
• Ferndale Public Library 5:30 PM: Fun with Dot and Dash Robots
• Ferndale Public Library: Tree Buds Infant Storytime, 2:00 PM
• Oak Park Library, It’s Story Time, Ages 2-6, 10:30 AM
• Oak Park Library: Adult Coloring Club, 6:00 PM
• Oak Park Library: Tournament Tuesdays 6:00 PM
• Detroit Fleat: Taco Tuesday with guest trucks

Weds. July 25
• Ferndale Library: Tree Sprouts Storytime, 10:30 AM
• GO! Comedy: 8PM: BITS ($10)
• Detroit Fleat: Trivia Night
• Book Share Blastoff/Storytime: Kulick Community Center Park, 10:30 AM

Thur. July 26
• Ferndale Public Library: Uprooted Music and Movement, 10:30 AM
• Oak Park Library: Family Game Night, 6:00 PM

Fri. July 27
• Detroit Fleat: Live Music, 8 PM

Sat. July 28
• Rock the Clinic! July 28, 2018, Saturday, 8 PM-1 AM, New Way Bar, 23130 Woodward
• Ferndale Public Library: Sensory Saturdays, 2:00 PM
• Magic Bag: The Alarm Featuring Mike Peters
• Detroit Fleat: Food Truck Rally, 12 PM-6 PM
• Ferndale’s Fusion Festival, Martin Park, 9 AM-4 PM

Sun. July 29
• Art in the Park, a free children’s art experience presented by the Hazel Park Arts Council at the Hazel Park Growers and Makers Market, Green Acres Park
• Detroit Fleat: Food Truck Brunch, 11:00 AM
• Yoga In The Park, 11 AM-Noon, Geary Park

Mon. July 30
• Oak Park Library: Adult Computer Class, 9:00 AM
• Loaded Die, Rust Belt Market: Board Game Night

Tues. July 31
• Ferndale Public Library: Tree Buds Infant Storytime, 2:00 PM
• Oak Park Library, It’s Story Time, Ages 2-6, 10:30 AM
• Oak Park Library: Adult Coloring Club, 6:00 PM
• Oak Park Library: Tournament Tuesdays, 6:00 PM
• Detroit Fleat: Taco Tuesday with guest trucks

Wed. August 1
• Ferndale Library: Tree Sprouts Storytime, 10:30 AM
• GO! Comedy: 8PM: BITS ($10)
• Oak Park Library: Book Club 6:00 PM
• Detroit Fleat: Trivia Night

Thur. August 2
• Ferndale Public Library, 2 PM: Rockstar Fashion Designing with College of Creative Studies
• Ferndale Public Library: Uprooted Music and Movement, 10:30 AM
• Oak Park Library: Family Game Night, 6:00 PM

Fri. August 3
• Detroit Fleat: Live Music, 8 PM
• Family Unity Party, 6-8 PM, Geary Park

Sat. August 4
• Aug 4 Natl Mead Day Celebration Planavon lot
• Ferndale Public Library: Sensory Saturdays, 2:00 P.M.
• Detroit Fleat: Food Truck Face-off, 12 PM-6 PM

Sun. August 5
• Art in the Park, a free children’s art experience presented by the Hazel Park Arts Council at the Hazel Park Growers and Makers Market, Green Acres Park
• Detroit Fleat: Food Truck Brunch, 11:00 AM
• Yoga In The Park, 11AM-Noon, Geary Park
• Hazel Park Memorial Museum open Noon-4 PM

Mon. August 6
• Oak Park Library: Adult Computer Class, 9:00 AM
• Loaded Die, Rust Belt Market: Board Game Night

Tue. August 7
• Fermdale Public Library Summer Concert Series, 6:30 PM, (Musique Noire)
• Fermdale Public Library, 1 PM: Album Art Photography with College of Creative Studies
• Ferndale Library: Tree Buds Infant Storytime, 2:00 PM
• Oak Park Library, It’s Story Time, Ages 2-6, 10:30 AM
• Oak Park Library: Adult Coloring Club, 6:00 PM
• Oak Park Library: Tournament Tuesdays, 6:00 PM
• Detroit Fleat: Taco Tuesday with guest trucks
• Citizens For A Fair Ferndale, Ferndale Library 6:30 PM
• August Primary: Get out and vote!
• Tree Buds & Stroller Fitness, 2PM, Harding Park

Weds. August 8
• Ferndale Library: Tree Sprouts Storytime, 10:30 A.M.
• GO! Comedy: Eighth Annual Detroit Improv Festival
• Detroit Fleat: Trivia Night

Thur. August 9
• 6-8 PM: Sock Hop with Bouncer at Wanda Park
• Ferndale Public Library: Uprooted Music and Movement, 10:30 A.M.
• GO! Comedy: Eigth Annual Detroit Improv Festival
• Oak Park Library: Family Game Night, 6:00 PM

Fri. August 10
• GO! Comedy: Eigth Annual Detroit Improv Festival
• Berkley Art & About
• Detroit Fleat: Live Music, 8 PM

Sat. August 11
• 14th Annual Green Cruise, Ferndale City Hall
• Ferndale Public Library Evening: Finale Pool Party for SRP participants
• Ferndale Public Library: Sensory Saturdays, 2:00 PM
• GO! Comedy: Eigth Annual Detroit Improv Festival
• Detroit Fleat: Slooshie Bar, 6 different boozy slushees at the patio bar, 12-6 PM.

Sun. August 12
• Art in the Park, a free children’s art experience presented by the Hazel Park Arts Council at the Hazel Park Growers and Makers Market, Green Acres Park
• Detroit Fleat: Food Truck Brunch, 11:00 AM
• Yoga In The Park, 11 AM-Noon, Geary Park
• GO! Comedy: Eighth Annual Detroit Improv Festival

Mon. August 13
• Oak Park Library: Adult Computer Class, 9:00 AM
• Loaded Die, Rust Belt Market: Board Game Night

Tues. August 14
• Ferndale Public Library: Tree Buds Infant Storytime, 2:00 PM
• Oak Park Library, It’s Story Time, Ages 2-6, 10:30 AM
• Oak Park Library: Adult Coloring Club, 6:00 PM
• Oak Park Library: Tournament Tuesdays, 6:00 PM
• Detroit Fleat: Taco Tuesday with guest trucks

Weds. August 15
• Ferndale Library: Tree Sprouts Storytime, 10:30 AM
• Detroit Fleat: Trivia Night

Thur. August 16
• Ferndale Public Library: Uprooted Music and Movement, 10:30 AM
• Oak Park Library: Family Game Night, 6:00 PM
• Ferndale Beautification Commission Monthly Meeting, 6:30 P.M. at the Ferndale Public Library
• Safety Town Back To School Safety, 6 PM, Garbutt Park
• Get Reel Movies On Vester, starts at dusk
• Ferndale Woodward Dream Cruise, Downtown

Fri. August 17
• Berkley CruiseFest
• Detroit Fleat: Live Music, 8 PM
• Ferndale Woodward Dream Cruise, Downtown

Sat. August 18
• Ferndale Public Library: Sensory Saturdays, 2:00 PM
• Detroit Fleat: Disco Brunch with DJ Joe V., 11 AM-4 PM. Brunch options from all food trucks.
• Ferndale Woodward Dream Cruise, Downtown

Sun. August 19
• Art in the Park, a free children’s art experience presented by the Hazel Park Arts Council at the Hazel Park Growers and Makers Market, Green Acres Park
• Detroit Fleat: Food Truck Brunch, 11:00 AM
• Yoga In The Park, 11 AM-Noon, Geary Park

Mon. August 20
• Oak Park Library: Adult Computer Class, 9:00 AM

Tues. August 21
• Ferndale Library: Tree Buds Infant Storytime, 2:00 PM
• Oak Park Library, It’s Story Time, Ages 2-6, 10:30 AM
• Oak Park Library: Adult Coloring Club, 6:00 PM
• Oak Park Library: Tournament Tuesdays, 6:00 PM
• Detroit Fleat: Taco Tuesday with Guest trucks

Weds. August 22
• Ferndale Library: Tree Sprouts Storytime, 10:30 AM
• Detroit Fleat: Trivia Night

Thur. August 23
• Ferndale Public Library: Uprooted Music and Movement, 10:30 AM
• Ferndale Beautification Commission, 6:30 P.M. at the Ferndale Public Library “Monarch Project” Program
• Berkley Pub Crawl. 5:30 PM, berkleychamber.com
• Oak Park Library: Family Game Night, 6:00 PM

Fri. August 24
• Detroit Fleat: Live Music, 8 PM

Sat. August 25
• Hazel Park Art Fair, Hazel Park Arts Council
• Ferndale Public Library: Sensory Saturdays, 2:00 PM
• Detroit Fleat: Food Truck Rally, 12 PM-6 PM
• Mom 2 Mom Sale, 1-5 PM, Kulick Center

Sun. August 26
• Art in the Park, a free children’s art experience presented by the Hazel Park Arts Council at the Hazel Park Growers and Makers Market, Green Acres Park
• Detroit Fleat: Food Truck Brunch, 11:00 AM
• Yoga In The Park, 11 AM-Noon, Geary Park

Mon. August 27
• Oak Park Library: Adult Computer Class, 9:00 AM
• Loaded Die, Rust Belt Market: Board Game Night

Tues. August 28
• Ferndale Library: Tree Buds Infant Storytime, 2:00 PM
• Oak Park Library, It’s Story Time, Ages 2-6, 10:30 AM
• Oak Park Library: Adult Coloring Club, 6:00 PM
• Oak Park Library: Tournament Tuesdays, 6:00
• Detroit Fleat: Taco Tuesday with guest trucks
Weds. August 29
• Ferndale Library: Tree Sprouts Storytime, 10:30 AM
• Detroit Fleat: Trivia Night

Thur. August 30
• Ferndale Public Library: Uprooted Music and Movement, 10:30 AM
• Oak Park Library: Family Game Night, 6:00 PM

Fri. August 31
• Detroit Fleat: Live Music, 8 PM

 

Sat. September 1
• Ferndale Public Library: Sensory Saturdays, 2:00 PM
• Detroit Fleat: Food Truck Face-off, 12 PM-6 PM

Sun. September 2
• Art in the Park, Hazel Park Arts Council at the Hazel Park Growers and Makers Market, Green Acres Park
• Detroit Fleat: Food Truck Brunch, 11 AM
• Yoga In The Park, 11 AM-Noon, Geary Park

Mon. September 3
• Oak Park Library: Adult Computer Class, 9:00 AM
• Loaded Die, Rust Belt Market: Board Game Night

Tues. September 4
• Ferndale Library: Tree Buds Infant Storytime, 2:00 PM
• Oak Park Library, It’s Story Time, Ages 2-6, 10:30 AM
• Oak Park Library: Adult Coloring Club, 6:00 PM
• Oak Park Library: Tournament Tuesdays, 6:00
• Detroit Fleat: Taco Tuesday with Guest trucks
• Citizens For A Fair Ferndale, Ferndale Library, 6:30 PM

Weds. September 5
• Ferndale Library: Tree Sprouts Storytime, 10:30 AM
• Oak Park Library: Book Club, 6:00 PM
• Detroit Fleat: Trivia Night

Thur. September 6
• Ferndale Public Library: Uprooted Music and Movement, 10:30 AM
• Oak Park Library: Family Game Night, 6:00 PM

Fri. September 7
• Berkley: Oakland County Irish Fest
• Detroit Fleat: Live Music, 8 PM

Sat. September 8
• Berkley: Oakland County Irish Fest
• Ferndale Public Library: Sensory Saturdays, 2:00 P.M.
• Detroit Fleat: Slooshie Bar, 6 different boozy slushees at the patio bar, 12-6 PM.

Sun. September 9
• Art in the Park, Hazel Park Arts Council at the Hazel Park Growers and Makers Market, Green Acres Park
• Detroit Fleat: Food Truck Brunch 11:00 AM
• Yoga In The Park, 11 AM-Noon, Geary Park

Mon. September 10
• Oak Park Library: Adult Computer Class, 9:00 AM
• Loaded Die, Rust Belt Market: Board Game Night
Tues. September 11
• Ferndale Library: Tree Buds Infant Storytime, 2:00 PM
• Oak Park Library, It’s Story Time, Ages 2-6, 10:30 AM
• Oak Park Library: Adult Coloring Club, 6:00 PM
• Oak Park Library: Tournament Tuesdays, 6:00 PM
• Detroit Fleat: Taco Tuesday with guest trucks

Weds. September 12
• Ferndale Library: Tree Sprouts Storytime, 10:30 AM
• Detroit Fleat: Trivia Night

Thur. September 13
• Library ADULTING 101 Series (Dinner Parties), 6:30 P
• Ferndale Public Library: Uprooted Music and Movement, 10:30 AM
• Oak Park Library: Family Game Night, 6:00 PM

Fri. September 14
• Oktoberfest – Ciders & Seasonals: Royal Oak Farmers Market
• Berkley Art & About

Sat. September 15
• Ferndale Public Library: Sensory Saturdays, 2:00 PM
• Oktoberfest – Ciders & Seasonals Royal Oak Farmers Market
• Detroit Fleat: Disco Brunch with DJ Joe V.

Sun. September 16
• Art in the Park, Hazel Park Arts Council at the Hazel Park Growers and Makers Market, Green Acres Park
• Detroit Fleat: Food Truck Brunch, 11:00 AM
• Yoga In The Park, 11 AM-Noon, Geary Park

Mon. September 17
• Oak Park Library: Adult Computer Class 9:00 AM
• Loaded Die, Rust Belt Market: Board Game Night

Tues. September 18
• Ferndale Public Library: Tree Buds Infant Storytime, 2:00 P.M.
• Oak Park Library, It’s Story Time, Ages 2-6 10:30 AM
• Oak Park Library: Adult Coloring Club 6:00 PM
• Oak Park Library: Tournament Tuesdays 6:00
• Detroit Fleat: Taco Tuesday with Guest trucks

Weds. September 19
• Ferndale Public Library: Tree Sprouts Storytime, 10:30 A.M.
• Detroit Fleat: Trivia Night

Thur. September 20
• Ferndale Public Library: Uprooted Music and Movement, 10:30 A.M.
• Ferndale Beautification Commission Monthly Meeting, 6:30 P.M. at the Ferndale Public Library
• Oak Park Library: Family Game Night 6:00 PM
• Get Reel Movies On Vester, starts at dusk

Fri. September 21
• Detroit Fleat: Live Music 8PM
• DIY StreetFair, Downtown Ferndale
• Funky Ferndale Art Fair, Downtown Ferndale

Sat. September 22
• Ferndale Public Library: Sensory Saturdays, 2:00 P.M.
• Detroit Fleat: Food Truck Rally 12pm-6pm
• DIY StreetFair, Downtown Ferndale
• Funky Ferndale Art Fair, Downtown Ferndale

Sun. September 23
• Art in the Park, a free children’s art experience presented by the Hazel Park Arts Council at the Hazel Park Growers and Makers Market, Green Acres Park
• Detroit Fleat: Food Truck Brunch 11:00 AM
• DIY StreetFair, Downtown Ferndale
• Funky Ferndale Art Fair, Downtown Ferndale

Mon. September 24
• Oak Park Library: Adult Computer Class 9:00 AM
• Loaded Die, Rust Belt MarketL Weekly Board Game Night

Tues. September 25
• Ferndale Public Library: Tree Buds Infant Storytime, 2:00 P.M.
• Oak Park Library, It’s Story Time, Ages 2-6 10:30 AM
• Oak Park Library: Adult Coloring Club 6:00 PM
• Oak Park Library: Tournament Tuesdays 6:00
• Detroit Fleat: Taco Tuesday with Guest trucks

Weds. September 26
• Ferndale Public Library: Tree Sprouts Storytime, 10:30 A.M.
• Detroit Fleat: Trivia Night

Thur. September 27
• Ferndale Public Library: Uprooted Music and Movement, 10:30 A.M.
• Oak Park Library: Family Game Night 6:00 PM

Fri. September 28
• Detroit Fleat: Live Music 8PM

Sat. September 29
• Ferndale Public Library: Sensory Saturdays, 2:00 P.M.

Sun. September 30
• Art in the Park, a free children’s art experience presented by the Hazel Park Arts Council at the Hazel Park Growers and Makers Market, Green Acres Park
• Detroit Fleat: Food Truck Brunch 11:00 AM

Mon. October 1
• Oak Park Library: Adult Computer Class 9:00 AM
• Loaded Die, Rust Belt MarketL Weekly Board Game Night

Tues. October 2
• Ferndale Public Library: Tree Buds Infant Storytime, 2:00 P.M.
• Oak Park Library, It’s Story Time, Ages 2-6 10:30 AM
• Oak Park Library: Adult Coloring Club 6:00 PM
• Oak Park Library: Tournament Tuesdays 6:00
• Citizens For A Fair Ferndale, Ferndale Library 6:30 PM

Weds. October 3
• Ferndale Public Library: Tree Sprouts Storytime, 10:30 A.M.

Thur. October 4
• Ferndale Public Library: Uprooted Music and Movement, 10:30 A.M.
• Ferndale Octoberfest, Downtown Ferndale

Fri. October 5
• OktoBEER Festival, Ferndale
• Ferndale Octoberfest, Downtown Ferndale

Sat. October 6
• Artober presented by the Hazel Park Arts Council
• Ferndale Public Library: Sensory Saturdays, 2:00 P.M.
• Ferndale Beautification Commission Annual Block Party and presentation of the Block Award
• OktoBEER Festival, Ferndale
• Ferndale Fall Fest: Martin Road Park
• Ferndale Octoberfest, Downtown Ferndale

Sun. October 7
• OktoBEER Festival, Ferndale
• Art in the Park, a free children’s art experience presented by the Hazel Park Arts Council at the Hazel Park Growers and Makers Market, Green Acres Park

Tues. October 9
• Ferndale Public Library: Tree Buds Infant Storytime, 2:00 P.M.
• City Hall: Last day to register for the November general election

Weds. October 10
• Ferndale Public Library: Tree Sprouts Storytime, 10:30 A.M.

Thur. October 11
• Ferndale Public Library: Uprooted Music and Movement, 10:30 A.M.

Sat. October 13
• Ferndale Public Library: Sensory Saturdays, 2:00 P.M.
• Whiskey N Wine Fest, Royal Oak Farmers Market

Sun. October 14
• Art in the Park, a free children’s art experience presented by the Hazel Park Arts Council at the Hazel Park Growers and Makers Market, Green Acres Park

Tues. October 16
• Ferndale Public Library: Tree Buds Infant Storytime, 2:00 P.M.

Weds. October 17
• Ferndale Public Library: Tree Sprouts Storytime, 10:30 A.M.

Thur. October18
• Ferndale Public Library: Uprooted Music and Movement, 10:30 A.M.
• Ferndale Beautification Commission Monthly Meeting, 6:30 P.M. at the Ferndale Public Library

Sat. October 20
• Ferndale Public Library: Sensory Saturdays, 2:00 P.M.
• Fall Fling 2018 at Affirmations

 

Tue. 23
• Ferndale Public Library: Tree Buds Infant Storytime, 2:00 P.M.

Weds. 24
• Ferndale Public Library: Tree Sprouts Storytime, 10:30 A.M.

Thur. 25
• Ferndale Public Library: Uprooted Music and Movement, 10:30 A.M.

Sat. October 27
• Ferndale Public Library: Sensory Saturdays, 2:00 P.M.

 

Tues. October 30
• Ferndale Public Library: Tree Buds Infant Storytime, 2:00 P.M.

By Rebecca Hammond

NATIVE PLANT PARTNER-IN-CRIME MARLEIJA FOREY recently recommended on Facebook the book Braiding Sweetgrass, by Robin Wall Kimmerer, an inspiring phytophile (plant lover). This is the only book I ever read that I refused to completely finish, being too sad.

The author writes as both the holder of a PhD in botany and from her  Native American background, and revealssecrets of plants most of us are blind to. We do notice beauty from plants wec hoose for that purpose, and the hassle of removing plants we don’t, but relatively little is known in the scientific community about how they interact, even less outside it.

Four local (and rather different) phytophiles who are always on my social-media radar weigh in on plants in their lives:

FERNDALE RESIDENT GRETCHEN ABRAMS turned her yard native long ago, and recently discovered the health benefits of house plants. “I thought my house was too dark, so for years I have cultivated outdoor spaces, at home and in schoolyards. I love gardening and have studied much the impact on children, anxiety, ADHD, etc., only recently have I spent time learning more about house plants. I work at a historic house museum with 87 acres of land on Lake St Claire, and we employ a full-time garden staff that includes two horticulturalists. Since I knew much about the physical and psychological benefit of being outdoors, hiking, and generally spending time amongst the green, it only made sense that bringing the green indoors could have similar benefits. My research had confirmed this hunch. Now I can thrive on green and gardening all year long.”

ROSS SANDELIUS is about to go native. Finding an antidote to a stressful job a few years back when he stumbled on a few cardboard tomato seed pods in a clearance aisle, a few months later enjoying the harvest. A few YEARS later he found himself with 25 plants in five-gallon buckets, started from seeds inside. “From that point on, learning how plants grow and how they ‘live’ became a full-on obsession.” He and his wife Julie bought their first house last August. “This spring/summer is probably going to be a lot of landscaping, making flower beds and getting the first year of perennials in and situated. My goal this year is to get a solid foundation down. Figure out what the soil is like, what my realistic options are, getting everything as neutral and healthy (naturally) as possible.

“Some fun little projects are installing a screech owl box on a nearby tree, creating a specific zone for pollinators that provides food and water for them, starting a worm farm and laying down the groundwork for a water feature and turning my garage roof into a water reclamation system that will provide at least 50 per cent of the water for my garden. And I’m a nerd, so naturally I want to automate that as much as possible. I hope to learn how to strike a balance with my obsessive nature and channel that into providing a natural, balanced and sustainable environment for plants and animals around my house while also providing a stress-relieving outlet for myself and my wife.”

DAVE ASSEMANY’S GARDEN in Pleasant Ridge is downright famous, locally. “As a 55-year-old man, I have found that gardening has not stopped being a major source of pleasure for me, but it has also grown to be a way that I interact with my community. My actual family is not into gardening or nature, but my gardening family is huge and brings me much joy and love. From a very young age I have needed to be outside as much as possible. I was fussing around in fields and creeks in Farmington where I grew up when I was barely in school. As I grew, gardening seemed like a natural way to channel that impulse. I get so much enjoyment just watching stuff grow. Even though I love showing my garden off, I would garden no matter what. I don’t do it for the results, as much as I love them, I do it for the process which brings me peace and joy.”

Like Gretchen, MARLEIJA has been involved in community projects, working with several local urban-forestry groups. “I became interested in tree planting around 2012 when I went to my first planting with The Greening of Detroit. I thoroughly enjoyed the smell and touch of soil and walking through forests so it went well together.”

She’s now helping start The Social Forestry Project. “Our main focus in this very early stage of a new non-profit is to be the ‘hands’ for established environmental organizations throughout SE Michigan. An organization we have been close to, for instance, is ReLeaf Michigan. They have the space and the trees and we come in to do the dirty work. We are starting to focus on saving saplings and growing them ourselves. We are on the lookout for oaks, red maples, gingkos, sycamores, London plane tree, crabapples. We have a few amazing green thumbs on the board.”

Marleija got a pleasant surprise and headstart for this year’s garden when she cleaned out the space behind the garage last year. “Someone had been dumping their yard waste back there for decades and it was perfect compost. We’re going to put a whole bunch of hostas back there and maybe some ferns because it doesn’t get much light.”

Common vines wound through each passionate statement, especially gardening’s benefits for mood and health, and the opportunity for community service and connection.

From Braiding Sweetgrass: “In a consumer society, contentment is a radical proposition. Gratitude doesn’t send you out shopping to find satisfaction; it comes as a gift rather than a commodity, subverting the foundation of the whole economy. That’s good medicine for the land and the people alike.” All around us are people cultivating good medicine. I’m grateful to these four for sharing theirs.

Becky Hammond lives and gardens in Ferndale.

By Mary Meldrum

THE LAST PERFORMANCE FOR THE LOCAL ALL-MOM ROCK BAND, the Mydols, was about seven or eight years ago at the Motor City Casino, when they opened for the B52s. The band dissolved, and since then, no moss has grown under the feet of one of the former lead singers, April Jones Boyle. In fact, Boyle was just igniting her rocket fuel and getting started.

A staggeringly prolific entrepreneur and a fireball of creativity, Boyle has disrupted, engaged, impacted, finessed and handcrafted a life and a career that is a textbook demonstration of how to be a force-multiplier on Planet Earth. It is difficult to know where to begin describing her spirit and her ascent.

I’ll try. Currently, April Jones Boyle is the founder and Executive Director of Build Institute (an organization that she conceived and grew out of the D:hive, where she was also a founding member). I almost need bullet points for the rest of the list. She was the co-creator of several ventures, including the Hootenanny Kids concert series; she is a co-owner in Gold Cash Gold restaurant; she is on the board of Kiva Detroit and also the advisory board for Ponyride. And that is not all.

She is the co-creator of Komodo Kitchen, an Indonesian pop-up supper club that in 2011 was one of the first pop-ups on the scene in the Detroit area, and hosted by the Pinwheel Bakery in Ferndale.

“My partner, Gina Onyx, is from Indonesia. We wanted to create a unique experience for diners,” Boyle says.

Concentrating solely on Build Institute now, Boyle fuels a network of grassroots programs to assist people in turning their project or business ideas into a reality. “Build Institute is focused on access and equity.”
And they have hit some amazing milestones. I give up. I’m using bullet points:

● Six years of small business activation and support, with participants from over 100 zip codes, and 70 per cent women and 60 per cent people of color.
● Ten years of “Open City” forums, with thousands of attendees.
● 1,400 program graduates, with over 350 businesses and 500 jobs created or retained.
● Winner of the Bank of America Neighborhood Builder Award.
● $175,450 in funding to 30 entrepreneurs through Kiva Detroit.

“I think entrepreneurship is an art,” Boyle says. “You have to be open to opportunity, and try new things.”

AS A RESULT OF HER LACKLUSTER EXPERIENCE with an accelerator years ago, Boyle ended up becoming a founding member of D:hive in Detroit, and launched an eight-week business planning course for entrepreneurs. It was focused on small businesses that were aspiring to be brick-and-mortar – lifestyle, ma-and-pa, micro and social enterprise, passion businesses – all the stuff that didn’t neatly fit into the common tech and scale business sector.

“If you look at the demographics at the time [of D:hive], the economics of it was focused on technology and scale companies, and the demographics of that sector was mostly white male. And when you looked at the demographics of the city of Detroit, those two things did not match up,” Boyle explains. “I saw an opportunity, and a gap that showed we were leaving a bunch of talent on the table.”

April knew that if Detroit was going to make a full and sustainable recovery, and be a vibrant, inclusive, diverse city, then everyone needed to have an opportunity to build wealth, a business, a life and contribute in some way. Her passion was to make this vision of Detroit a reality.

“We launched private training classes because we saw a gap in needed education, resources and support for entrepreneurs who were women and people of color. The program grew exponentially, and I became the Director of Small Business Initiatives inside of D:hive,” Boyle says.

BUILD INSTITUTE EVENTUALLY SPUN OFF of D:hive, and continued under the Downtown Detroit Partnership. Recently, Build Institute left the DDP and became a 501.c.3 nonprofit organization.

Build Institute is now partnering with the City of Ferndale to provide a series of classes and activities to support aspiring and experienced entrepreneurs and small businesses. With the support from the City, classes are open to Ferndale residents or anyone looking to open a business in Ferndale. Registration is open for “Build Basics and GROW Peer Roundtables” to be held at the Rust Belt Market.

The core business and project planning class is designed for aspiring and established entrepreneurs. Classes cover all the basics of starting a business – from licensing to financial literacy, market research to cash flow and more. Participants leave with a completed business plan and the knowledge and confidence to take your idea to the next level. For more information and to register: http://buildinstitute.org/ferndale/.

“We have graduated over 1,400 aspiring and experienced entrepreneurs from our various programs. We run the Kiva program locally – an international micro-lending platform – and we just acquired and took on the operations of Detroit Soup, which is a micro-granting dinner platform.”

Build Institute was just featured in the Stanford Social Innovation Review as an example of best practices in working with micro-enterprise. Boyle and the Build Institute continue to find more people considering entrepreneurship as a path-way out of poverty and into economic mobility and vitality.

Boyle says. “We believe that independent small business is the backbone of the community. They create jobs that will not be outsourced, they also hire local, they keep the money in the local economy, they help develop commercial corridors and neighborhoods, and more importantly, they keep the culture unique.”

Boyle believes that as big corporate and conglomerates come in, every community needs to give their local independent businesses the tools to deal with and compete with those entities.

BUILD INSTITUTE WILL BE MOVING THEIR HEADQUARTERS to the corner of Michigan and Trumbull, the old Tiger Stadium site. They are currently in lease negotiations with the property developers.

“We will be creating inclusive innovation, shared work space, pop-up retail and workshops, as well as classroom and event space for our community,” Boyle shares.
Having recently graduated the first Build Institute class in Ferndale, Boyle remains super-motivated for social justice, economic justice and also creativity and autonomy. Stand back – April Jones Boyle looks to empower and help each individual define success for themselves on their terms. And I am rock-solid sure she is going to make that happen.

Story By Ingrid Sjostrand | Photo By Bernie Laframboise

WHEN WARMER WEATHER APPROACHES, also with it comes the many orange barrels and road closings of looming construction. One such project expected to cause some disruption this summer season is the resurfacing of Livernois St., and it has many business owners concerned.

The construction is currently slated for June 1st through November 10th and, while its main purpose is repairing and resurfacing road conditions, plans are also set to incorporate protected bike lanes, improve pedestrian crossings and move bike racks. Justin Lyons, planning manager for the City of Ferndale, explains:

“The overall project area includes Livernois from W. 9 Mile to 8 Mile Road. The intersection at W. 9 Mile and Livernois will be improved with a new mast arm traffic signal (similar to the signals at Pinecrest, Bermuda, etc.) and a public plaza,” Lyons says. “A small amount of striping work will also be completed on the Detroit side of the Livernois/Eight Mile intersection.”

The long length of the project is intended to avoid closing the entire stretch of road at once.

“Construction efforts will be staggered/phased so that only one section is being fully disrupted at any given time, which is why the construction period lasts until November,” he says. “There will always be a minimum of one lane open in each direction on Livernois.”

FREQUENTLY REFERRED TO AS THE “UP-AND-COMING” area of Ferndale, Livernois is a street with a variety of light industrial businesses and a growing retail and restaurant presence. Siouxsan Miller, co-owner of Green Daffodil located at 624 Livernois, has run her retail storefront since 2009 and knows the area well.

“We are windows on the world for what goes on there on a daily basis. For a long time we have been the only business with an actual open sign, so we talk with a lot of business owners and folks who live in the area,” Miller says. “We have lots of thoughts and concerns about the proposed street project and the time frame that it might occur.”

These concerns include available parking during construction, the length of the project and if these changes are even necessary. Many of these sentiments are mirrored by other business owners like Je Donna Dinges, who moved her women’s clothing store Margaux & Max to 561 Livernois in September of 2016, and Dan Riley of Axle Brewing, which opened at 567 Livernois in June 2017.

Riley is most concerned about the availability of parking since his brewery and biergarten can accommodate over 150 people and summer will be their busiest season.

“If all street parking on Livernois is impacted for the duration of the project, as opposed to in phases, it will definitely have a major impact on our business during our important summer season.” Riley says. “We are the only hospitality business on the street and one of a few open to customers relying on street parking.”

Dinges echoes these fears, and hopes the City will provide some solutions, “There are already parking issues on Livernois due to the limited number of parking spaces. How will the city ensure that customers can reasonably get to the businesses on Livernois?”

THE MOST RESOUNDING FRUSTRATION was the lack of information available and communicated with businesses. Dinges didn’t even hear of the project until talking to other businesses and never heard back after reaching out to City officials.

“That was two weeks ago, and I have not heard one word,” she says. “The City needs to communicate with the businesses impacted by this construction every step of the way.”

“We really don’t want overkill done to our area, but we do want things done that make sense to the area’s real needs and would like to have a voice,” Miller says. “We are all small, professional business owners who need to know what type of construction might go on this year. We need the ability to plan and make changes to our business models to be able to weather construction pains.”

Lyons says the City has presented plans for the project at City Council meetings. He hopes to remedy much of the concern through an information and question-and-answer session scheduled for Thursday April 26th at the Gerry Kulick Community Center, and they have already started brainstorming solutions to many of the problems, including parking.

“More information will be provided at the April meeting, but the City is exploring options to help provide temporary parking solutions, including providing off-street spaces at the Kulick Community Center, wayfinding signage, and rideshare promotions.”

Lyons says many factors went into the timing of this project including the City’s Master Plan and the recently passed Road Improvement Bond, but the main reason is due to Federal funding that expires at the end of 2018.

“Construction is never easy for small businesses and homeowners, but the end result will make Livernois a greatly improved street for all users. Livernois is a key corridor for the entire city, and already has a number of great small businesses, artists, and long-time residents that has grown and changed over the years.” Lyons says. “This investment by the City (with federal funds) demonstrates a commitment to the corridor with a street design that encourages people to visit Livernois by multiple modes of transportation and continue to be a walkable district.”

More information and updates about the Livernois resurfacing project can be found at ferndalemoves.com/project/livernois-street.

Story & Photos By: Jon Szerlag

WITH A DESIRE TO GIVE BACK TO THE COMMUNITY, and the State of Michigan, one local resident has taken her passion for mysteries and puzzles to try to give unidentified remains in Michigan their name back, and possibly bring closure for their family.

Leslie Merritt recently started a group that meets in person to go online and perform research of unidentified remains in Michigan, and try to match them with missing persons in the state. “I want to give peace to families,” said Merritt. “I want them to not have to think every day of their lives if their (family member) is alive and out there.”

Merritt started by going to the web site www.NamUs.gov which lists missing people and information regarding unidentified remains. There are thousands of missing people and unidentified people throughout the United States, and Merritt focuses on only ones that are missing in Michigan, and in the Metro area if possible. She also likes to look at older cases.

The family and friends of those missing are never contacted while poring over the databases and doing other research. But if Merritt believes that she has a good case for a match, she will reach out to the detectives working the case and provide the information to see if they believe it should be followed up or not.

OE OF THE FIRST CASES MERRITT WORKED ON was the remains of an unidentified woman from the late 1980s. She went through all the minute details of the information provided and thought she had a good match. She also reached out to a forum, WebSleuths.com, to have them look over her investigation.

The detective working the case told Merritt that they checked the dental records of the woman she thought was a match, but they were not the same person. But it was going through these cases and having discussions on associated forums that made Merritt want to start a group.

“Whenever I would do a case, I would post on Web Sleuth so other people could take a look at it before I would send it to the police,” said Merritt. “That is why I thought a group would be a good idea, to have a lot of eyes looking at it.”

Merritt asked people on her personal Facebook if anyone would be interested. She did not get a response, so she decided to try Ferndale Forum. The response was much more than she was expecting.

“I was thinking it would only be a few people, but a ton of people were interested,” said Merritt, whose Facebook group has 85 members already. “It is really amazing with all the people who are here and their replies. They were really excited about it.”

NOW THE GROUP MEETS IN PERSON to go over cases and bounce ideas off one another. Merritt also has her own method, which involves a spreadsheet she created to help find similarities between the missing and unidentified persons.

“The whole point is to exclude the missing from the unidentified,” said Merritt. “If there is anything that is big that excludes the person, then you are done and have to go on to the next.”

Which can be hard, when dealing with missing people and after getting personally invested in the case. “It can be hard to give up because it definitely becomes personal,” said Merritt. “When you are really focused on a case, you really get to know the missing or unidentified person. I really felt like I was the voice for that girl (her first case), and I feel like I let her down. And there are no other leads in that case.”

Merritt remembered her first case where she thought she found a match, and how she started to wonder how no one could be looking for this person, or if the missing person was from another state or even Canada.

“I just want to bring peace to people, and I want to be the one who helps do that and solve that mystery,” said Merritt. “There are a ton of people that are identified, and it is hard to make sense of it because there are all of these missing people, as well. There have to be matches.”

The Facebook group is currently called The Ferndale Cold Case Group, and people can visit www.NamUs.gov to view cases of missing and unidentified people.

Nineteen people showed up for the first group meeting in Ferndale to look over a case involving the remains of an African American man found in the Detroit River in Ecorse, Michigan in 2014.

AS YOUNG PEOPLE THINKING ABOUT GROWING OLD, we all had things we feared about the transition. Losing our health, our agility, our looks, having to live on less money, being alone. These all looked so scary when we were in our 40s, and 50s.

But, in reality, as we reach and pass our 70s, we have encountered bad health and survived, learned to live on less money, we know our looks have faded, and accept our loss of agility.

Here is the secret: Losing our independence. That is it. That is at the base of all our fears. When we hear of one of our group moving into assisted, it is like hearing that that person has died. We all get somber, and quiet. That person is no longer independent. She cannot come and go as she pleases, she has to eat when and what someone else gives her, she lives under supervision. It doesn’t matter that our friend is 90-plus-years old or that she says that she loves it there. She has lost her right to make decisions, and that is so final.

Because of this, many of us tend to go to outrageous lengths to avoid asking for help. We don’t want to bother anyone. We struggle with heavy packages, climb on furniture to reach stuff, shovel snow, and in general tackle things we shouldn’t, just so we appear independent.

Virginia had a computer problem. The tech told her to bring it in. Problem? The computer was on her second floor. Not a problem for Virginia. She loaded it into her laundry basket, placed it by the stairs, scooted to the stairs, and nudged it down backwards, step by step. Clever? Yes, dangerous? Hell yes! But, she simply refused to ask anyone for help, although probably a half dozen would have. And I completely agree with her.

ONE DAY LAST WINTER, the garbage man left my cans on top of the snow banks. Totally inaccessible for me. Virginia made a suggestion, and it worked. I went out with a broom and banged the cans into the street, then went and collected them. I knew that I would only have to text my tenant, and he would have gotten them for me. But ask for help? Nope, not me.

Joyce goes out with a special shovel and gets the snow off her roof. Now, that takes strength.

I see my fellow seniors shoveling the free compost into small buckets in the back of their cars. They make several trips, taking three times as long as the job should take. I know why. They can’t lift and carry more than that bucket.

Sometimes we have to bite the bullet and ask, and I do. My son knows that if I am asking I have tried every-thing I can think. We are afraid of not being self sufficient, so we over-do.

Where am I leading with all this? I have no clue. It’s just the way it is.

So, the next time you see a little old lady doing something in a really odd manner, go ahead and laugh. We do.

Jeannie Davis, 248 541 5888